Brain cancer atlas created to help research and treatment efforts for glioblastoma

May 11, 2018 by Bob Yirka, Medical Xpress report
Glioblastoma (histology slide). Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0

A large team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and India has created an anatomic transcriptional atlas of human glioblastoma—an aggressive form of brain cancer. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the process by which the atlas was created and what it contains. It is called the Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas Project.

Glioblastoma, as the researchers note, is an extremely aggressive form of . Even with the most advanced treatment, most patients do not live more than a year after diagnosis. Because of its unique nature, the researchers concluded that an atlas was needed to combine results from research efforts. Such an atlas, they reasoned, would not only help with ongoing research efforts, but in diagnosing and treating patients.

In setting out to build the atlas, the researchers noted that a lot of research has been done to understand and control . Much of it has centered on genomic alterations, which has resulted in the creation of gene expression profiles that describe the nature of tumors. To make the atlas, the researchers used records created for 41 actual —each offers general about a patient along with information about genetic testing that was done to find expression signatures. In many cases, signatures for different parts of a given tumor are described—they offer information about discreet cell types that can provide targets for research efforts. The records also typically hold histological information for various parts of the brain. It also includes relationships that have been observed between clinical and genomic information.

The resulting atlas is freely available online. The researchers offer examples of its use in research efforts. In one case, a team used it to sift potential drug treatments geared toward specific types of tumors. Another team used it to zero in on tumor areas, revealing cells involved in initiating growth.

Going forward, the researchers believe that as the evolves and new information is added, it will become a valuable research and treatment tool.

Explore further: Enzyme blocker stops growth of deadly brain tumor

More information: Ralph B. Puchalski et al. An anatomic transcriptional atlas of human glioblastoma, Science (2018). DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf2666

Abstract
Glioblastoma is an aggressive brain tumor that carries a poor prognosis. The tumor's molecular and cellular landscapes are complex, and their relationships to histologic features routinely used for diagnosis are unclear. We present the Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas, an anatomically based transcriptional atlas of human glioblastoma that aligns individual histologic features with genomic alterations and gene expression patterns, thus assigning molecular information to the most important morphologic hallmarks of the tumor. The atlas and its clinical and genomic database are freely accessible online data resources that will serve as a valuable platform for future investigations of glioblastoma pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.

Related Stories

Enzyme blocker stops growth of deadly brain tumor

May 11, 2018
Investigators were able to halt the growth of glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer, by inhibiting an enzyme called CDK5, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in Cell Reports.

New release of Glioblastoma Atlas sheds light on deadly disease

May 14, 2015
Robust new data added to the Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas Project (Ivy GAP) changes the scope and impact of this publicly available resource for researchers and clinicians searching for treatments for this most deadly and aggressive ...

Findings from breast and gynecological cancer study may have potential for future clinical applications

April 5, 2018
Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found a startling amount of new information about molecular features of tumors as well as identified previously unknown cancer subtypes based on a comprehensive ...

New Pathology Atlas maps genes in cancer to accelerate progress in personalized medicine

August 17, 2017
A new Pathology Atlas is launched today with an analysis of all human genes in all major cancers showing the consequence of their corresponding protein levels for overall patient survival. The difference in expression patterns ...

Undergraduate student uncovers genes associated with aggressive form of brain cancer

February 8, 2018
When Leland Dunwoodie, an undergraduate researcher in biochemistry, approached his PI about wanting to start research on "some human stuff" in the spring of 2016, he didn't imagine it would lead to the discovery of 22 genes ...

Using a microRNA to shift the makeup of glioblastoma subtypes

July 13, 2017
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an extremely aggressive brain cancer, is a very complex disease. It is characterized by a fast-growing tumor in the brain composed of many subpopulations of cells, including glioblastoma stem ...

Recommended for you

Fully reprogrammed virus offers new hope as cancer treatment

May 25, 2018
A cancer treatment that can completely destroy cancer cells without affecting healthy cells could soon be a possibility, thanks to research led by Cardiff University.

Research could help fine-tune cancer treatment

May 25, 2018
Cancer therapies that cut off blood supply to a tumour could be more effective in combination with existing chemotherapeutic drugs—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Increasing physical activity linked to better immunity in breast cancer patients, study finds

May 25, 2018
A new study from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education has found that moderate to vigorous physical activity may help regulate the levels of C-reactive protein – an important biomarker ...

Low-fat diet tied to better breast cancer survival

May 24, 2018
(HealthDay)—Breast cancer patients who adopted a low-fat diet were more likely to survive for at least a decade after diagnosis, compared to patients who ate fattier fare, new research shows.

A cascade of immune processes offers insights to triple-negative breast cancer

May 24, 2018
Cancer is crafty. To survive and thrive, tumors find a way of thwarting our body's natural systems.

By forming clots in tumors, immune cell aids lung cancer's spread

May 24, 2018
University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have found that by helping to form clots within tumors, immune cells that flock to a particular type of lung cancer are actually building a foundation ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.