Study compares neuropsychological tests for assessing deficits in MS

A recent article by Kessler Foundation researchers compared two neuropsychological tests for assessing learning in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). The article, "Comparing the Open Trial—Selective Reminding Test results with the California Learning Verbal Test II in Multiple Sclerosis" was published online on April 4, 2018, in Applied Neuropsychology: Adult.

This is the first study to compare the two tests in the same individuals with MS. The authors are Silvana L. Costa, Ph.D., John DeLuca, Ph.D., Kristen Costanza and Nancy Chiaravalloti, Ph.D. of Kessler Foundation.

Researchers administered the tests to 112 individuals with MS, 79 women and 33 men. Results showed clear differences in performance on the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT-II) and the Open Trial Selective Reminding Test (OT-SRT). On the OT-SRT, all participants were identified as impaired, while only 34 percent were similarly identified on the CLV-TII. Differences in administration of the tests may explain this disparity. With the OT-SRT learning and memory are tested with minimal reliance on other . With the CVLTII, reliance on other cognitive abilities is more prominent, likely affecting the testing results.

"It is essential that the accurately pinpoint the deficits in MS," said Dr. Costa, the lead author. "This is fundamental to developing interventions to address these deficits, and tailoring cognitive rehabilitation programs for maximal outcomes in this population."


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More information: Silvana L. Costa et al, Comparing the Open Trial – Selective Reminding Test results with the California Learning Verbal Test II in multiple sclerosis, Applied Neuropsychology: Adult (2018). DOI: 10.1080/23279095.2018.1448818
Provided by Kessler Foundation
Citation: Study compares neuropsychological tests for assessing deficits in MS (2018, May 24) retrieved 20 February 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-05-neuropsychological-deficits-ms.html
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