Fewer U.S. kids use tobacco, but numbers still too high: officials

June 7, 2018

(HealthDay)—The number of U.S. middle and high school students who use tobacco fell from 4.5 million in 2011 to 3.6 million in 2017, but that number is still far too high, federal health officials reported Thursday.

Nearly 1 in 5 high students and 1 in 18 middle schoolers reported current use (within the past 30 days) of any tobacco product in 2017, compared to nearly 1 in 4 high school students and 1 in 13 middle school students in 2011.

Since 2014, electronic cigarettes have been the most widely used tobacco product among both middle and high school students, according to the National Youth Tobacco Survey from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration.

Of the 3.6 million middle and high school students who used tobacco products last year, 2.1 million used e-cigarettes.

The survey also showed that among children who were tobacco users in 2017, 47 percent of high schoolers and 42 percent of middle schoolers used two or more tobacco products.

Among middle school students in 2017, 3.3 percent used e-cigarettes, 2.1 percent smoked cigarettes, 1.9 percent used smokeless tobacco, 1.5 percent used cigars, 1.4 percent used hookahs, 0.4 smoked pipe tobacco, and 0.3 percent used bidis.

Among in 2017, 11.7 percent used e-cigarettes, 7.7 percent used cigars, 7.6 percent used cigarettes, 5.5 percent used smokeless tobacco. 3.3 percent smoked hookahs, 0.8 percent used pipe tobacco, and 0.7 used bidis.

"Despite promising declines in tobacco use, far too many young people continue to use tobacco products, including e-cigarettes," CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield said in an agency news release. "Comprehensive, sustained strategies can help prevent and reduce tobacco use and protect our nation's youth from this preventable health risk."

To curtail tobacco use by children, the health officials recommend:

  • increasing prices of ;
  • sustaining media campaigns that warn about the dangers of tobacco product use;
  • restricting youth access to products;
  • protecting people from exposure to secondhand smoke and aerosol.

The survey findings were published in the June 8 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Explore further: No drop in teen use of tobacco products, CDC says, and E-cigs may be why

More information: The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids has more on the issue of children and tobacco.

Related Stories

No drop in teen use of tobacco products, CDC says, and E-cigs may be why

April 14, 2016
(HealthDay)—Use of tobacco products by U.S. teens hasn't fallen since 2011, and federal officials say electronic cigarettes may be to blame.

Tobacco use among US students dropped sharply in 2016: study

June 16, 2017
Tobacco use among American middle and high school students—especially electronic cigarette use—declined sharply in 2016 from the year before following several years of strong growth, according to a study out Thursday.

Most PA students tobacco-free, but vaping and cigarette use still a concern

February 26, 2018
Most of Pennsylvania's high school and middle school students are tobacco-free, but the use of cigarettes, and their digital counterpart, e-cigarettes, is still a cause for concern, according to Penn State researchers.

Teens often think E-cigs, hookah pipes harmless: CDC

March 15, 2018
(HealthDay)—Teenagers who use tobacco products other than cigarettes often see their habit as harmless, a new U.S. government survey finds.

About 20 percent of U.S. adults currently use tobacco products

November 13, 2017
(HealthDay)—About one in five U.S. adults currently uses any tobacco product, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Asthmatic teens even more likely to vape than those without the illness

May 31, 2018
(HealthDay)— Perhaps assuming that e-cigarettes are "safer" than tobacco, teens with asthma now vape at higher rates than those without the respiratory condition, new research shows.

Recommended for you

Eating breakfast burns more carbs during exercise and accelerates metabolism for next meal

August 15, 2018
Eating breakfast before exercise may "prime" the body to burn carbohydrates during exercise and more rapidly digest food after working out, University of Bath researchers have found.

Mixing energy drinks with alcohol could enhance the negative effects of binge drinking

August 14, 2018
A key ingredient of energy drinks could be exacerbating some of the negative effects of binge drinking according to a new study.

New study finds fake, low-quality medicines prevalent in the developing world

August 10, 2018
A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that substandard and falsified medicines, including medicines to treat malaria, are a serious problem in much of the world. In low- and middle-income ...

Insurance status tied to higher self-perceived poor/fair health

August 9, 2018
(HealthDay)—Underinsured and never insured adults are more likely than adequately insured adults to report poor/fair health and frequent mental distress (FMD), according to a study published online July 19 in the U.S. Centers ...

Carbon dioxide levels on flight deck affect airline pilot performance

August 8, 2018
Commercial airline pilots were significantly better at performing advanced maneuvers in a flight simulator when carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on the flight deck (cockpit) were 700 parts per million (ppm) and 1500 ppm than when ...

Giving kids plates with segments and pictures caused them to eat more vegetables

August 8, 2018
A pair of researchers at the University of Colorado has found that preschool kids ate more vegetables when presented with segmented plates with pictures of fruits and vegetables on them. In their paper published in JAMA Pediatrics, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.