Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes reduces follow-up costs by more than half

June 29, 2018, University of Eastern Finland (UEF Viestintä)
Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes reduces follow-up costs by more than half. Credit: University of Eastern Finland (UEF Viestintä)

Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes used in combination with an electronic feedback system results in considerable savings on health care costs especially in sparsely populated areas, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

Self-monitoring delivers considerable savings on the overall costs of type 2 diabetes care, as well as on ' travel costs. Glycated hemoglobin testing is an important part of managing diabetes, and also a considerable cost item. By replacing half of the required follow-up visits with self-measurements and electronic feedback, the annual total costs of glycated hemoglobin monitoring were reduced by nearly 60 per cent, bringing the per-patient cost down from 280 EUR (300 USD) to 120 EUR (130 USD). With fewer follow-up visits required, the average annual travel costs of patients were reduced over 60 per cent, from 45 EUR (48 USD) to 17 EUR (18 USD) per patient. The study was published in the International Journal of Medical Informatics.

Carried out in the region of North Karelia in Finland, the study applies geographic information systems (GIS) -based geospatial analysis combined with patient registers. This was the first time the costs of type 2 diabetes follow-up were systematically calculated over a care district in Finland. The study analysed 9,070 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Combined travel and time costs amount to 21 per cent of the total costs of glycated hemoglobin monitoring for patients with type 2 diabetes.

"The societal cost-efficiency of type 2 diabetes care could be improved in by taking into consideration not only the direct costs of glycated hemoglobin monitoring, but also the indirect costs, such as patients' travel costs," Researcher Aapeli Leminen from the University of Eastern Finland says.

The study used a georeferenced cost model to analyse health care accessibility and different costs associated with the follow-up of type 2 . Patients' and time costs were analysed by looking at how well health care services could be reached on foot or by bike, or by using a private car, a bus, or a taxi. According to Leminen, the combination of patient registers and GIS opens up new opportunities for research within the sector.

"This cost model we've now tested in the eastern part of Finland can easily be used in other places as well to calculate the of different diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases."

Explore further: HbA1c targets should be personalized in type 2 diabetes

More information: Aapeli Leminen et al. Self-monitoring induced savings on type 2 diabetes patients' travel and healthcare costs, International Journal of Medical Informatics (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2018.04.012

Related Stories

HbA1c targets should be personalized in type 2 diabetes

June 20, 2018
(HealthDay)—For non-pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) targets should be personalized, according to a Clinical Guidelines Synopsis published in the June 19 issue of the Journal of the American ...

Total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes $327 billion in 2017

March 28, 2018
(HealthDay)—The total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2017 was $327 billion, including $237 billion in direct medical costs, according to a study published online March 22 in Diabetes Care.

High costs for diagnosis, care of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

June 11, 2018
(HealthDay)—The health care costs associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are considerable, especially at first diagnosis, according to a study published online May 18 in Hepatology.

Maintaining body weight linked to reduced costs in T2DM

August 30, 2016
(HealthDay)—For patients with type 2 diabetes, maintaining body weight is associated with a reduction in medical care costs, while weight gain is associated with variable cost increases depending on the hemoglobin A1C level, ...

U.S. nursing home costs due to diabetes vary greatly by state

May 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—Diabetes-attributable nursing home costs are substantial, but vary greatly across the nation, according to a study published online May 14 in Diabetes Care.

Reduced health care use for exenatide regimens in T2DM

March 2, 2017
(HealthDay)—For patients with type 2 diabetes, treatment with exenatide is associated with reduced health care resource use and costs compared with basal insulin (BI) regimens, according to a study published online Feb. ...

Recommended for you

Can't exercise? A hot bath may help improve inflammation, metabolism, study suggests

November 14, 2018
Hot water treatment may help improve inflammation and blood sugar (glucose) levels in people who are unable to exercise, according to a new study. The findings are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

Diabetic foot ulcers heal quickly with nitric oxide technology

November 12, 2018
Diabetic foot ulcers can take up to 150 days to heal. A biomedical engineering team wants to reduce it to 21 days.

Diabetes drug might also ease heart failure risks

November 12, 2018
(HealthDay)—The diabetes drug Farxiga might do double-duty for patients, helping to ward off another killer, heart failure, new research shows.

Marijuana use tied to serious diabetes complication

November 8, 2018
(HealthDay)—People with type 1 diabetes who use marijuana may double their risk of developing a life-threatening complication, a new study suggests.

Researchers report connection between intestinal bacteria and development of diabetes

November 7, 2018
Researchers at Örebro University have, together with a well-known research team in Denmark, developed a method for studying how metabolism in gut bacteria influences health. Their method will now be published in its entirety ...

Genetic factors tied to obesity may protect against diabetes

November 2, 2018
Some genetic variations linked with obesity actually protect against Type 2 diabetes, heart attack and stroke, new findings suggest.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.