Stress affects people with schizophrenia differently, study shows

July 11, 2018, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and other brain imaging technologies allow for the study of differences in brain activity in people diagnosed with schizophrenia. The image shows two levels of the brain, with areas that were more active in healthy controls than in schizophrenia patients shown in orange, during an fMRI study of working memory. Credit: Kim J, Matthews NL, Park S./PLoS One.

Stressful situations affect the brain and body differently in people with schizophrenia compared to people without the mental illness or individuals at high risk for developing psychosis, a new CAMH study shows. The relationship between two chemicals released when people experienced stress—one released in the brain and the other in saliva—differs in people with schizophrenia. The discovery, recently published in the journal Brain, may provide clues into how to act early to prevent schizophrenia.

"We found a disrupted response in people with , which did not occur in either healthy individuals or people at clinical high risk for developing psychosis," says Dr. Christin Schifani, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Research Imaging Centre in CAMH's Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, and lead author of the study.

As most people with schizophrenia experience psychosis, identifying differences between people at high risk for psychosis and those with schizophrenia may shed light on how schizophrenia develops and ways to prevent its onset.

"The fact we see this disrupted in people with schizophrenia, but not in people at high risk for psychosis, suggests an opportunity to intervene to prevent schizophrenia," says Dr. Romina Mizrahi, Clinician Scientist in the Campbell Institute at CAMH, and senior author of the study. "Developing strategies to cope with stress and build resilience may be the opportunity."

Dr. Mizrahi leads the Focus on Youth Psychosis Prevention (FYPP) Clinic and research program at CAMH, which is dedicated to the early identification and treatment of people aged 16 to 35 who are at high risk of developing psychosis. Helping people to identify sources of stress and adopt coping strategies is a key focus of the clinic's work. Assessing the impact of stress management strategies to reduce psychosis and schizophrenia risks will be a goal of future research.

In the current study, these new insights come from examining two important chemical messengers—dopamine and cortisol—in people under stress. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that carries signals from one brain cell, or neuron, to another. In this study, the researchers focused on dopamine released in the , the region at the front of the brain involved in complex functions, including regulating emotions. Cortisol is a hormone, released from the adrenal glands to help the body handle stressful situations.

In healthy individuals, both dopamine and typically increase when people experience stress. This link between dopamine release and cortisol release did not appear in people with schizophrenia. "Cortisol is the main stress hormone, so this suggests a disrupted stress regulatory system in people with schizophrenia," says Dr. Mizrahi.

To investigate responses to stress, the researchers used a math test. In the first stage of the study, participants answered math questions on a computer screen without any time limit while a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner produced an image of dopamine in their brain as they completed the task. In the second stage—the stress test—participants answered math questions under time constraints and while receiving negative verbal feedback, also in the PET scanner. Saliva samples were collected during both stages to measure cortisol levels. The study included 14 people with schizophrenia, 14 people at clinical high risk for psychosis and 12 people without mental illness.

The findings build on Dr. Mizrahi's earlier research in another region of the brain, the striatum. "Our previous research had shown that people at high risk for psychosis and those experiencing a first episode of psychosis have abnormal, or increased dopamine release in response to stress in the striatum," says Dr. Mizrahi. "Since the prefrontal cortex is involved in regulating striatal dopamine release, we wanted to understand what was happening in the step before the striatum."

But, contrary to what they had expected, the researchers did not find significant differences in release in the prefrontal cortex among the three groups of participants. "Our findings of an increase in in the striatum, but not in the cortex, show the complex brain regulatory systems in both people at for psychosis and with schizophrenia," says Dr. Mizrahi.

Explore further: Study shows biological changes that could underlie higher psychosis risk in immigrants

More information: Christin Schifani et al, Cortical stress regulation is disrupted in schizophrenia but not in clinical high risk for psychosis, Brain (2018). DOI: 10.1093/brain/awy133

Related Stories

Study shows biological changes that could underlie higher psychosis risk in immigrants

January 10, 2017
A new study could explain how migrating to another country increases a person's risk of developing schizophrenia, by altering brain chemistry.

Researchers find clues to treating psychoses in mental health patients

May 16, 2018
Psychotic disorders often are severe and involve extreme symptoms such as delusions or hallucinations in which people lose their sense of reality. Researchers at the University of Missouri recently found evidence that boosting ...

Schizophrenia affects your body, not just your brain – new study

May 11, 2018
Schizophrenia is considered a disorder of the mind, influencing the way a person thinks, feels and behaves. But our latest research shows that organs, other than the brain, also change at the onset of the disease.

Autism traits increase thoughts of suicide in people with psychosis

December 14, 2017
People with autism traits who have psychosis are at a greater risk of depression and thoughts of suicide, new research has found.

People with schizophrenia account for more than one in ten suicide cases

June 22, 2018
A new CAMH and Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) study shows that people with schizophrenia account for more than 1 in 10 cases of suicide in Ontario, and that young people are disproportionately affected.

Link between hallucinations and dopamine not such a mystery, finds study

February 16, 2018
Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) and New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI) found that people with schizophrenia who experience auditory hallucinations tend to hear what they expect, ...

Recommended for you

New research has revealed we are actually better at remembering names than faces

November 14, 2018
With the Christmas party season fast approaching, there will be plenty of opportunity to re-live the familiar, and excruciatingly-awkward, social situation of not being able to remember an acquaintance's name.

The illusion of multitasking boosts performance

November 13, 2018
Our ability to do things well suffers when we try to complete several tasks at once, but a series of experiments suggests that merely believing that we're multitasking may boost our performance by making us more engaged in ...

Brain changes found in self-injuring teen girls

November 13, 2018
The brains of teenage girls who engage in serious forms of self-harm, including cutting, show features similar to those seen in adults with borderline personality disorder, a severe and hard-to-treat mental illness, a new ...

Major traumatic injury increases risk of mental health diagnoses, suicide

November 12, 2018
People who experience major injuries requiring hospital admission, such as car crashes and falls, are at substantially increased risk of being admitted to hospital for mental health disorders, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian ...

Nearly one in ten Americans struggles to control sexual urges

November 9, 2018
(HealthDay)—The #MeToo movement has given many Americans a glimpse into an unfamiliar world that may have left many wondering, "What were they thinking?"

Brain activity pattern may be early sign of schizophrenia

November 8, 2018
Schizophrenia, a brain disorder that produces hallucinations, delusions, and cognitive impairments, usually strikes during adolescence or young adulthood. While some signs can suggest that a person is at high risk for developing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.