Survey asks public for insights into ethnic inequalities in mental health care

July 12, 2018, University of Manchester

The first national online survey to give members of the public the opportunity to set the research priorities in the field of ethnic inequalities and severe mental illness has been launched today.

Led by the Synergi Collaborative Centre, the national public will shape the centre's future work programme, facilitate the creation of research strategies to tackle mental inequalities and help launch a national campaign to transform health systems.

Reflective of Synergi's co-production of knowledge approach, the 15-minute survey aims to secure the opinions of a wide cross section of the public, including patients, carers, health and social care practitioners, commissioners, NGOs, volunteers and students.

The survey is being launched against a backdrop of longstanding ethnic inequalities, including the fact that compared to the majority population, a diagnosis of schizophrenia is five to six times more likely in Black African people and Black Caribbean people, and nearly three times more likely in South Asian people.

As for detention rates among the civil population, Black Caribbean people and Black African people are three times more likely to be detained.

"This is the first time there has been a priority setting exercise for addressing ethnic inequalities in , especially regarding research," said Project Lead Kamaldeep Bhui CBE of Queen Mary University of London.

"We will be gathering knowledge and assembling views from all stakeholders to establish which are the most pressing issues to tackle and how best to rank them, linked to actions. Rather than replicating past studies, to relearn what has been forgotten, repressed, denied or overlooked, this survey will be forward facing to promote a new approach to set out research areas for impact on reducing aversive ethnic inequalities."

"One of the things that has prevented progress is the under-representation of the full range of experiences of this issue. We will systematically analyse the responses to uncover points of agreement and disagreement to ensure the full range of views are heard," added James. "We particularly want to forefront the views of service users and the public, which are often unheard in these discussions."

The survey, which will be open to the public until 10 October, covers a wide range of topics that accommodate intersectionality, the criminal justice system, housing, education, homelessness, health services, racism and commissioning. The main findings will be shared with policymakers, research institutions and commissioners, and will be made available to the public from November 2018.

Explore further: New hope on black schizophrenia care crisis

Related Stories

New hope on black schizophrenia care crisis

September 7, 2017
A groundbreaking talking treatment has been developed and successfully trialled with a group of black and minority ethnic (BME) schizophrenia service users, carers, community members and health professionals.

Brazil has improved health care for all, but inequalities persist

November 18, 2016
Brazil, through a combination of public policies and its Unified Health System, has significantly improved access to medical care for a wide swath of its population, but more can be done to eradicate health inequalities there, ...

Ethnicity impacts perceptions of mental health among black communities

October 8, 2015
When it comes to self-reported mental health among black Americans, ethnicity may play a role in how individuals perceive their status, say researchers at the University of Michigan.

Ethnic inequalities in mental health care prompt call for review

July 15, 2013
Individual ethnic groups use psychiatric and mental health services in Scotland very differently, a study suggests.

Prejudice against black and ethnic Scots widespread

August 3, 2017
Around one third of black and ethnic minority people in Scotland have experienced discrimination within the last two years, research reveals.

UK census reveals stark divide in health of nation

October 10, 2013
Researchers at The University of Manchester have shown how ethnic minority groups in England and Wales have been consistently more unhealthy than the majority White population.

Recommended for you

1 in 9 U.S. adults over 45 reports memory problems

July 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—If you're middle-aged and you think you're losing your memory, you're not alone, a new U.S. government report shows.

Antioxidant benefits of sleep

July 12, 2018
Understanding sleep has become increasingly important in modern society, where chronic loss of sleep has become rampant and pervasive. As evidence mounts for a correlation between lack of sleep and negative health effects, ...

Footwear habits influence child and adolescent motor skill development

July 11, 2018
New research finds that children and adolescents who spend most of their time barefoot develop motor skills differently from those who habitually wear shoes. Published in Frontiers in Pediatrics, this is the first study to ...

How a Mediterranean diet could reduce osteoporosis

July 11, 2018
Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Extreme heat and reduced cognitive performance in adults in non-air-conditioned buildings

July 10, 2018
Students who lived in dormitories without air conditioning (AC) during a heat wave performed worse on a series of cognitive tests compared with students who lived in air-conditioned dorms, according to new research led by ...

Suppressing negative emotions during health scare may whip up spiral of fear

July 10, 2018
Trying to suppress worries during a health scare, like the recent Zika outbreak, may lead to an ever-intensifying cycle of emotional suppression and fear, according to a team of researchers.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.