New technology can keep an eye on babies' movements in the womb

July 19, 2018 by Bridie Kennerley, Imperial College London
Credit: Imperial College London

A new system for monitoring fetal movements in the womb, developed by Imperial researchers, could make keeping an eye on high-risk pregnancies easier.

Monitoring the movements of in the womb is crucial to providing medical help when it's needed. At the moment we rely on mothers-to-be noticing if their child has stopped moving around as much and seeking medical help.

But this isn't always very reliable and could mean women not seeking help when it's needed or feeling worried unnecessarily, particularly for , such as situations where the baby isn't growing as well as it should be.

Dr. Niamh Nowlan, from the Department of Bioengineering at Imperial, said: "The movements of a baby in the womb – – are an important sign of the baby's health. However, there is currently no way to monitor fetal movements outside of a hospital."

Now, Dr. Nowlan with Dr. Ravi Vaidyanathan, from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and their collaborators have developed a sensor that can be worn for an extended period of time and tracks the baby through its movements and sound. Their research is published in the journal PLoS One.

Acoustic sensors: About the new research

Dr. Nowlan's research group focuses on the ways that fetal movements can affect skeletal development and lead to disorders such as hip dysplasia, where the hip joint is too loose. To do so, they needed to be able to track fetal movements throughout a , in order to look at and understand conditions as they develop.

To work on technology that could help with this, Dr. Nowlan teamed up with Dr. Vaidyanathan and researchers from the Centre for Fetal Care at the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.

There have been previous attempts to create a system that could be worn over extended periods of time that have relied on accelerometers, which detect , but these often couldn't tell the difference between the movements of the mother and the child. The new technology uses a combination of accelerometers with new acoustic (sound) .

Dr. Nowlan said: "Our device is the first to use to detect movements. It is also unique in that it can account for movements of the mother, which other previously proposed sensors cannot. We believe that this is a key aspect of the technology which will lead to successful adoption in the clinic and home."

Widespread use: Hopes for the future

The device was tested for accuracy by checking its results against ultrasounds being run simultaneously, and found to be effective in detecting strong, fast movements of the baby. This sort of technology would be incredibly helpful if developed to the point where it can be used clinically, particularly for high-risk pregnancies. The team hopes to eventually commercialise the now-patented technology.

Dr. Nowlan said: "We are hopeful that this technology could be in widespread use within ten years. Some technical improvements are needed to improve the accuracy of the device, and then we will do a clinical trial to compare the against the current gold standard for high risk pregnancies."

Explore further: Monitoring fetal movements helps detect musculoskeletal malformations

More information: Jonathan Lai et al. Performance of a wearable acoustic system for fetal movement discrimination, PLOS ONE (2018). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0195728

Related Stories

Monitoring fetal movements helps detect musculoskeletal malformations

January 24, 2018
A team of researchers with Imperial College London and Great Ormond Street Hospital, both in the U.K., has found that monitoring fetal movements in pregnant women can help in detecting fetal musculoskeletal malformations. ...

Mom may pass bacteria to baby in utero

July 6, 2018
For decades, it has been accepted that fetal development occurs in a sterile womb. Recent discoveries of bacterial DNA in baby's first bowel movement and in the placenta after sterile C-section, however, have challenged this ...

High blood pressure in pregnancy linked to mother's heart function

July 9, 2018
Pregnant women who develop high blood pressure, or have small babies, may have hearts that pump less blood with each beat.

Sleep on your side, not your back in late pregnancy

October 12, 2017
A pregnant mother sleeping on her back during late pregnancy may cause problems for the fetus, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. This is the first study to monitor unborn babies overnight and ...

Recommended for you

Why mothers in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan choose cesarean delivery

October 16, 2018
Pregnant women in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan are more likely to express preference for cesarean section (CS) as their mode of delivery later in pregnancy and postpartum, as compared to early in pregnancy, according ...

Importance of cell cycle and cellular senescence in the placenta discovered

October 15, 2018
Working with researchers from Stanford University and St. Anna Children's Cancer Research, researchers from Jürgen Pollheimer's laboratory at the Medical University of Vienna's Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology have ...

C-section rates have nearly doubled since 2000: study

October 12, 2018
(HealthDay)—The number of women delivering babies via cesarean section has nearly doubled worldwide since 2000, to about 21 percent, new research shows.

Study of nearly 41,000 women who almost died giving birth shows who's most at risk

October 10, 2018
Tens of thousands of American women each year need emergency treatment to save their lives while they deliver their babies, or immediately after. A new study shows how much their risk of a life-threatening birth depends on ...

In childbirth, when to begin pushing does not affect C-section rates

October 9, 2018
More than 3 million women in the United States give birth each year. But obstetricians have differing opinions about when women should begin pushing during labor and whether the timing of pushing increases the likelihood ...

Why single embryo transfer during IVF sometimes results in twins or triplets

October 8, 2018
It has been known for some time that it is better to transfer a single embryo to a woman's womb during assisted reproduction treatment (ART) rather than several embryos in order to avoid a multiple pregnancy and the risks ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.