How doctors receive feedback is key for antimicrobial programs

How doctors receive feedback is key for antimicrobial programs
(HealthDay)—Anticipation of how providers will receive feedback is important for antimicrobial stewardship programs to consider in informing educational messaging, according to a study published online June 7 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

Tara H. Lines, Pharm.D., from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a 20-question survey of 211 inpatient providers to understand antimicrobial use (AU) attribution scenarios, feedback methods, and implementation barriers. The providers' specialties were critical care, emergency medicine, infectious diseases, medicine subspecialties, and surgery.

The researchers found that disagreement regarding AU attribution rose as AU scenarios became more complex. Respondents generally agreed on feedback methods, preferring electronic format, quarterly frequency, and grouped by similar services. Providers had a high level of concern about of quantitative AU data accounting for clinical care complexity, illness severity, and accuracy.

"Understanding provider opinions can improve acceptance, anticipate operational issues, and inform educational messaging," the authors write.


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Citation: How doctors receive feedback is key for antimicrobial programs (2018, August 2) retrieved 26 May 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-doctors-feedback-key-antimicrobial.html
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