Parents' smoking and depression linked to increased ADHD risk in children

A new study has identified adults' smoking and depression as family environmental factors associated with the development of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

The findings, which are published in Asia Pacific Psychiatry, come from an analysis of information on 23,561 in Korea.

From a public healthcare perspective, the results illuminate the need to increase awareness of parental factors that have the potential to contribute to ADHD in children. This could be incorporated into 'stop smoking' campaigns or depression self-recognition programs.

"Our finding added to the evidence supporting the need for ADHD prevention strategies and would be helpful in the development of effective public prevention policies intended to promote heathy family environments," said corresponding author Dr. Jin-won Kwon, of Kyungpook National University, in South Korea.


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More information: Youn Joo Cho et al, Parental smoking and depression, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: Korean national health and nutrition examination survey 2005-2014, Asia-Pacific Psychiatry (2018). DOI: 10.1111/appy.12327
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Citation: Parents' smoking and depression linked to increased ADHD risk in children (2018, August 8) retrieved 24 March 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08-parents-depression-linked-adhd-children.html
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