How salt can trigger inflammation in multiple sclerosis

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Researchers at Yale have identified a high-salt environment as one of the contributing factors to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS).

In a new study published Oct. 29 in the journal Nature Immunology, they report just how salt can trigger the potentially disabling autoimmune disorder.

First author Tomokazu Sumida, a researcher in the lab of David Hafler, the William S. and Lois Stiles Edgerly Professor of Neurology and professor of immunobiology, and colleagues report that cells in a high-salt environment show activation of the beta-catenin/Wnt signaling pathway. This pathway, which also been implicated in the development of cancer tumors, disrupts regulatory T cells and triggers inflammation.

The risk of developing MS is thought to increase by interaction between relatively common genetic variants and . In addition to salt, vitamin D deficiency, smoking, and obesity have been linked to development of MS, researchers say.


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Gene variants linked to multiple sclerosis disrupt key regulator of inflammation

More information: Tomokazu Sumida et al. Activated β-catenin in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells links inflammatory environments to autoimmunity, Nature Immunology (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41590-018-0236-6
Provided by Yale University
Citation: How salt can trigger inflammation in multiple sclerosis (2018, October 30) retrieved 17 January 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-10-salt-trigger-inflammation-multiple-sclerosis.html
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