Parsing diabetic skin infections

December 3, 2018 by Paul Govern, Vanderbilt University
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

People with diabetes are more susceptible to skin infection. According to a new study by C. Henrique Serezani, Ph.D., Stephanie Brandt, Ph.D., and colleagues, this susceptibility might be due to overabundance of a compound produced by phagocytes, called leukotriene B4 (LTB4).

The team found high levels of this inflammatory mediator in different mouse models of . High LTB4 in these mice was associated with larger nonhealing lesion areas and increased bacterial loads, as well as "dysregulated cytokine and chemokine production, excessive neutrophil migration but impaired abscess formation, and uncontrolled collagen deposition."

Shutting down LTB4's cellular receptor, BLT1, restored and abscess formation, leading to reductions in bacterial load and lesion size.

The authors conclude that "exaggerated LTB4/BLT1 responses mediate a derailed inflammatory milieu that underlies poor host defense in diabetes. Prevention of LTB4 production/actions could provide a new therapeutic strategy to restore host defense in diabetes."

The study appeared in the journal JCI Insight.

Explore further: Molecular link between obesity and type 2 diabetes reveals potential therapy

More information: Stephanie L. Brandt et al. Excessive localized leukotriene B4 levels dictate poor skin host defense in diabetic mice, JCI Insight (2018). DOI: 10.1172/jci.insight.120220

Related Stories

Molecular link between obesity and type 2 diabetes reveals potential therapy

February 23, 2015
Obesity causes inflammation, which can in turn lead to type 2 diabetes. What isn't well established is how inflammation causes diabetes—or what we can do to stop it. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School ...

New drug target for inflammatory disease is all the RAGE

December 21, 2016
Researchers have shown that Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) helps to regulate a key signaling pathway known to promote both acute and chronic inflammation. The development of therapeutic drugs targeted ...

When push comes to shove: Airway cells propel liver cancer spread to lungs

June 4, 2018
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer, and the third biggest cause of death from cancer worldwide. Although HCC patients have benefited from recent improvements in diagnoses and various therapies, ...

A categorically novel finding: Fighting against severe and progressive pulmonary hypertension

September 2, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a condition characterized by increased blood pressure in the lungs. It frequently leads to early death in patients. Numerous macrophages, which are cells that mainly engulf ...

New discovery solves problem of anti-inflammatory substance

March 3, 2014
There have been great expectations regarding the production of a drug to block the enzyme LTA4 hydrolase, which plays a key role in the body's inflammatory response. However, in clinical trials, such molecules have proven ...

Recommended for you

Very low calorie diets trialled by NHS to tackle diabetes

December 7, 2018
Hundreds of thousands of people will receive NHS help to battle obesity and type 2 diabetes under radical action set out by Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England.

Newly identified T cells could play a role in cancer and other diseases

December 6, 2018
Researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology have identified a new type of T cell called a phospholipid-reactive T cell that is able to recognize phospholipids, the ...

Classifying brain microglia: Which are good and which are bad?

December 6, 2018
Microglia are known to be important to brain function. The immune cells have been found to protect the brain from injury and infection and are critical during brain development, helping circuits wire properly. They also seem ...

New therapeutic avenue for type 2 diabetes

December 6, 2018
Restoring the action of insulin is one of the keys to fighting type 2 diabetes. Researchers from Inserm led by Dominique Langin at the Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases (Inserm/Université de Toulouse) are ...

Subtype of immune B cells can delay type 1 diabetes onset in mice

December 6, 2018
A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Michigan Medical School reports today in the JCI Insight that a subset of immune B cells, known as CD19+IgM+ B cells, can delay the onset of type 1 ...

Memory B cells in the lung may be important for more effective influenza vaccinations

December 5, 2018
Seasonal influenza vaccines are typically less than 50 percent effective, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies. Research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, published this week in Nature ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Anonym230660
not rated yet Dec 03, 2018
I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2017. I started the some diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn't right and began to do a lot of research. Then I found Ella's diabetes story (google " How Ella freed diabetes " ) I read that article from end to end because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next week my blood sugar was down to 100 and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70's and the 80's. My doctor took me off the metformin after just three week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 16 pounds and 3+ inches around my waist in a month.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.