Study examines the effects of weight loss surgery between pregnancies

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During 2002–2014, there was a 13-fold increase in weight loss surgeries among women aged 15–44 years in New South Wales, Australia, and undergoing such surgery between a first and second pregnancy was associated with lower risks of hypertension, preterm birth, and other outcomes in the second pregnancy.

The findings are published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

The authors of the study noted that the likelihood of adverse pregnancy outcomes among women who underwent did not decrease to the level observed in the general population of women who became pregnant, however.

"Weight loss surgery for the treatment of obesity is likely to improve outcomes in a subsequent pregnancy," said lead author Ibinabo Ibiebele, of The University of Sydney Northern Clinical School.


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More information: I Ibiebele et al. Perinatal outcomes following bariatric surgery between a first and second pregnancy: a population data linkage study, BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology (2019). DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.15993
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Citation: Study examines the effects of weight loss surgery between pregnancies (2019, November 29) retrieved 8 December 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-11-effects-weight-loss-surgery-pregnancies.html
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