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Managing cardiovascular disease risk factors may help preserve physical function as we age

blood vessel
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Managing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors may play a role in preserving physical function during the aging process, according to new research published today in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A.

"Approximately 10% of older adults have and diminished physical function that leads to adverse health outcomes and ," said lead author Dr. Shivani Sahni. "Since loss of physical function contributes to reduced mobility, disability, institutionalization, and mortality, management of CVD can help preserve physical function with age," she said.

This study showed that vascular measures are associated with grip strength in cross-sectional analyses and change in gait speed (a measure of physical function) in longitudinal analyses.

"This is one of the first community-based studies to comprehensively examine relations of aortic stiffness and vascular function with age-related decline in physical function. Higher aortic stiffness was associated with loss of physical function over ~11 years," said Dr. Sahni, who is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an Associate Scientist at the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife. She directs the Nutrition Program at the Marcus Institute.

"Blood flow declines with aging, in part due to arterial stiffening. Consequent dysfunction in blood vessel dynamics may contribute to organ pathology and declines in muscle mass," explains Dr. Sahni. Yet, few studies have specifically assessed the role of vascular function, and changes in functional muscle measures such as mobility and muscle strength.

The current study utilized data from a large cohort of relatively healthy men and women and extends previous investigations by utilizing a longitudinal study design.

The majority of previously published studies have utilized cross-sectional study designs with modest sample sizes. The authors believe that future studies should evaluate whether interventions that target vascular health may reduce age-related declines in physical function. This is important because one third of older adults experience physical limitations contributing to reduced mobility, disability, institutionalization, and mortality. Hence, there is a need for development of novel interventions that target prevention of physical limitations in .

More information: Shivani Sahni et al, Association of Vascular Health Measures and Physical Function: A Prospective Analysis in the Framingham Heart Study, The Journals of Gerontology: Series A (2023). DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glad097

Provided by Hebrew SeniorLife Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research
Citation: Managing cardiovascular disease risk factors may help preserve physical function as we age (2023, May 15) retrieved 23 July 2024 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-05-cardiovascular-disease-factors-physical-function.html
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