Cornell Food & Brand Lab

The Food and Brand Lab is a non-profit research facility at Cornell University which focuses on why people buy and eat the foods they do in the quantities they do. The stated mission of the Lab is to "Conduct top level academic research that enables consumers to use food to help them 'to be what they want to be' -- this could involve eating less, eating better, or enjoying food more." By focusing on behavioral and psychological explanations as to why people overeat and why they have the food preferences they have, the Lab aims at helping individuals and health care providers change food-related behaviors and improve health. The Lab is the main force behind the Small Plate Movement, which is encouraging consumers to use smaller dinner plates in their homes and is encouraging restaurants to use smaller plates in their restaurants.

Website
http://foodpsychology.cornell.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_and_Brand_Lab

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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