Entomological Society of America

The Entomological Society of America (ESA) has been in existence since 1889. ESA is a non-profit organization committed to serving its 5700 etymologist members and individual members in etymology-related fields. ESA has member representatives from governmental agencies, educational institutions and professional associations who work in disciplines related to the study of insects. ESA publishes reports and research abstracts involving etymology and publishes The Annals of the Entomological Society of America, Environmental Entomology, Journal of Economic Entomology and Journal of Medical Entomology. The headquarters is in Lanham, Maryland with offices around the nation. ESA welcomes press and media inquiries.

Address
10001 Derekwood Lane, Suite 100, Lanham, MD 20706-4876
Website
http://www.entsoc.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entomological_Society_of_America

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