Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care

The Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG) (German: Institut für Qualität und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesenis) is a German agency responsible for assessing the quality and efficiency of medical treatments, including drugs, non-drug interventions (e.g. surgical procedures), diagnostic and screening methods, and treatment and disease management. IQWiG also supplies health information to patients and the general community. The organization is independent of the pharmaceuticals industry, contracted solely by the Federal Ministry of Health and the Joint Federal Committee. IQWiG was founded in 2004 under the directorship of Dr Peter Sawicki, who was in September 2010 replaced by Dr Jürgen Windeler. Its deputy director is Dr Stefan Lange. IQWiG is divided into the following departments, which publish reports: General health information, written in plain language, is additionally produced by a Health Information department. These departments are also supported by Administration and Communication departments.

Website
http://www.iqwig.de/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institute_for_Quality_and_Efficiency_in_Health_Care

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