Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia

Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia is located in the Oerias about 20km from Lisbon, Portugal. It was formed to study and research the genetic basis of development, evolution of complex systems, the genetics of complex human disease, and includes privileging organism centered approaches in experimental models that includes, plants, yeast, flies, and mice for the purpose of studying human disease. The BioInformatics, Cell Imaging, and Chemical and Biological Technology institutes are among the research centers of IGC Gulbenkian. It is the home to post-doctoral fellows, scientists working on individual research programs.

Address
Apartado 14 P-2781-901 Oeiras Portugal
Website
http://www.gulbenkian.pt/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instituto_Gulbenkian_de_Ci?ncia

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Neuroscience

Thin-film electrodes reveal key insight into human brain activity

Thin-film electrodes developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been used in human patients at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), generating never-before-seen recordings of brain activity ...

Quantum Physics

Quantum machine learning hits a limit

A new theorem from the field of quantum machine learning has poked a major hole in the accepted understanding about information scrambling.

Oncology & Cancer

Shining new light on immunotherapy for breast cancer

Immunotherapy that enhances the body's immune response has transformed the landscape for cancer treatment. These treatments have led to unprecedented survival outcomes in some cancer types, but not all patients are seeing ...

Nanophysics

Ion-selective smart porous membranes

A research group has developed an ion-selective smart porous membrane that can respond to outer stimuli, potentially paving the way for new applications in molecular separation and sensing applications.

Health

Five surprising ways plants can keep you healthy

Plants can hurt us (we see you, poison oak), but they can also heal. Many of modern medicine's powerful drugs, like aspirin, trace their roots back to leaves, bark and flowers.