Lund University

Lund University (Swedish: Lunds universitet) is one of Europe's most prestigious universities and Scandinavia's largest institutions for education and research, frequently ranked among the world's top 100 universities. The university, located in the city of Lund in the province of Scania, Sweden, traces its roots back to 1425, when a Franciscan studium generale was founded in Lund next to the Lund Cathedral, making it the oldest institution of higher education in Scandinavia followed by studium generales in Uppsala in 1477 and Copenhagen in 1479. The current university was founded in 1666 after Sweden had won Scania in the 1658 peace agreement with Denmark. Lund University has eight faculties, with additional campuses in the cities of Malmö and Helsingborg, with 47,266 students in more than 274 different programmes and 2000 separate courses. It belongs to the League of European Research Universities as well as the global Universitas 21 network.

Address
Paradisgatan 2, Lund, Skåne, Sweden
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Finger prosthesis provides clues to brain health

In a collaboration between Swedish and Italian researchers, the aim was to analyse how the brain interprets information from a virtual experience of touch, created by a finger prosthesis with artificial sensation. The result ...

Apr 04, 2017
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What cancer research can learn from military strategy

When David Gisselsson Nord, a cancer researcher at Lund University in Sweden, read a history book last summer, he was struck by the similarities between how cancer and insurgencies evolve over time. Could military strategy ...

Mar 08, 2017
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How blood can be rejuvenated

Our blood stem cells generate around a thousand billion new blood cells every day. But the blood stem cells' capacity to produce blood changes as we age. This leads to older people being more susceptible to anaemia, lowered ...

Feb 23, 2017
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Obesity reprogrammes muscle stem cells

Obesity is associated with reduced muscle mass and impaired metabolism. Epigenetic changes that affect the formation of new muscle cells may be a contributing factor, according to new research from Lund University, Sweden.

Feb 22, 2017
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