National University of Ireland, Galway

The National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway) (Irish Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh or OÉ Gaillimh) is a constituent university of the National University of Ireland. It is a tertiary-level educational institution located in Galway, Ireland. The university was founded in 1845 as Queen's College, Galway and was more recently known as University College, Galway (UCG) (Irish: Coláiste na hOllscoile, Gaillimh or COG). The current President, Taoiseach (Prime Minister), Tánaiste (Deputy Prime Minister) and Attorney General of Ireland are all past pupils. The actor Martin Sheen has also attended. The college opened for teaching in 1849 as Queen's College, Galway with 37 professors and 91 students and a year later became a part of the Queen's University of Ireland. The Irish Universities Act, 1908 made this college a constituent college of the new National University of Ireland, and under a new charter the name of the college was changed to University College, Galway. The university college was given special statutory responsibility under the University College, Galway Act, 1929 in respect of the use of the Irish language as the working language of the college.

Address
University Road, Galway, County Galway, Ireland
Website
http://www.nuigalway.ie/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_University_of_Ireland,_Galway

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Biomedical technology

Researchers discover way to switch on and speed up tendon healing

Researchers at CÚRAM, the SFI Research Centre for Medical Devices based at NUI Galway, have shown how the simple act of walking can power an implantable stimulator device to speed up treatment of musculoskeletal diseases.

Cardiology

New advice for treating high blood pressure

New research led by a professor at NUI Galway is set to change how doctors treat some patients with high blood pressure—a condition that affects more than one in four men and one in five women.

Psychology & Psychiatry

UK: Why 3,000 middle-aged men die by suicide each year?

A new report, published today, provides an in-depth examination into why men from disadvantaged backgrounds in their 30s, 40s and 50s are at higher risk of suicide than the rest of society. Men from low socio-economic backgrounds ...