Norwegian University of Science and Technology

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, commonly known as NTNU, is located in Trondheim. NTNU is the second largest of the eight universities in Norway, and, as its name suggests, has the main national responsibility for higher education in engineering and technology. In addition to engineering and the natural and physical sciences, the university offers advanced degrees in other academic disciplines ranging from the social sciences, the arts, medicine, architecture and fine art.

Website
http://www.ntnu.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_University_of_Science_and_Technology

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Health

The magic behind the medals

When the Norwegian cross-country skier Marit Bjørgen hung up her skis for the last time in April 2018, she was the winningest winter Olympian ever, with 8 Olympic gold medals, 18 world championship titles and 114 World Cup ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Passion trumps love for sex in relationships

Men initiate sex more than three times as often as women do in a long-term, heterosexual relationship. However, previous research shows that sex happens far more often whenever the woman takes the initiative, suggesting that ...

Diabetes

Well-known drug has less risk for preterm delivery in PCOS

Metformin can halve the risk of late miscarriage and preterm births for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS occurs in 10 to 15 percent of all women. The symptoms are irregular menstrual periods, increased levels ...

Genetics

How genes affect tobacco and alcohol use

The use of alcohol and tobacco is closely linked to several diseases, and is a contributing factor in many deaths. A recent study using data from 1.2 million people has now been published in the journal Nature Genetics. Several ...

Surgery

C-sections by trained health officers are a safe alternative

Sierra Leone has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in the world—for every 100,000 live births, 1360 women will die. In Norway, that number is just 5 women per 100,000 live births; in the US, it's 14, according ...

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