Santa Fe Institute

Oncology & Cancer

Could energy overload drive cancer risk?

It's well-known that obesity, diabetes, and chronic inflammation are major risk factors for cancer. But just how cancer evolves in people with these diseases—and why a healthy diet and exercising regularly can help prevent ...

Neuroscience

Broken brains and network structures

Sometimes a disease is the handiwork of a clear culprit: the invasion of a bacterium, or the mutation of a gene. Conventionally, scientists have assumed the same for neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, and ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How we see the world depends on who surrounds us

As we move through the world in our daily lives, we humans make judgments about ourselves and others, assessing our thoughts and status against what we perceive around us. You may think you're doing far better, or far worse ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Can a Zika outbreak be sustained sexually?

In most ways, Zika is a lot like other tropical fevers. People become infected when they are bitten by mosquitos. Infected mothers pass the virus to their unborn children.

Neuroscience

How neurons use crowdsourcing to make decisions

How do we make decisions? Or rather, how do our neurons make decisions for us? Do individual neurons have a strong say or is the voice in the neural collective?

Health

Aging gracefully in the rainforest

The Tsimane of Bolivian Amazonia aren't so different from the people living around you. Most adults live to 70, a few even to 90. They start aging in their 30s, just like we do. And for the Tsimane, the onset of physical ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Asking why pertussis is back, complex systems style

Pertussis, the bacteria that causes whooping cough, has made quite the comeback in recent years in the United States, but understanding its reemergence and global prevalence isn't a simple matter. This week a group of researchers, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Can social isolation fuel epidemics?

Conventional wisdom has it that the more people stay within their own social groups and avoid others, the less likely it is small disease outbreaks turn into full-blown epidemics. But the conventional wisdom is wrong, according ...

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