Society for General Microbiology

The Society for General Microbiology (SGM) is a learned society based in the United Kingdom but with members in more than 60 countries. With approximately 5000 members, it is the largest microbiological society in Europe. Interests of its members include basic and applied aspects of viruses, prions, bacteria, rickettsiae, mycoplasma, fungi, algae and protozoa, and all other aspects of microbiology. Its headquarters are near Reading, Berkshire. The society's current president is Hilary Lappin-Scott. The society was founded on 16 February 1945; its first president was Alexander Fleming. The SGM's first academic meeting was in July of that year and its first journal, the Journal of General Microbiology (later renamed Microbiology), came out in 1947. A symposium series followed in 1949, and a sister journal, the Journal of General Virology, in 1967. The society purchased its own headquarters in Reading in 1971, after sharing accommodation with the Biochemical Society in London, moving to its present location just outside Reading in 1991.

Website
http://www.sgm.ac.uk/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_General_Microbiology

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Signs of success in delaying onset of drug-resistant gonorrhoea in UK

Gonorrhoea threatens to become resistant to all of the antibiotics used to treat it. Today, Professor Cathy Ison will explain that campaigns in the UK to raise awareness of drug resistance among healthcare professionals, ...

Medical research

Research identifies how mouth cells resist Candida infection

Candida albicans is a common fungus found living in, and on, many parts of the human body. Usually this species causes no harm to humans unless it can breach the body's immune defences, where can lead to serious illness or ...

Medical research

Stomach bacteria switch off human immune defences to cause disease

Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium that establishes a life-long stomach infection in humans, which in some cases can lead to duodenal ulcers or stomach cancer. New research, presented at this week's Society for General Microbiology ...

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New long-term antimicrobial catheter developed

A novel antimicrobial catheter that remains infection-free for up to twelve weeks could dramatically improve the lives of long-term catheter users. The scientists who have developed the new technology are presenting their ...

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TB outbreaks could be 'solved' by DNA tracking

Reconstructing the spread of killer diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) from person to person using DNA sequencing quickly identifies the origin and movement of pathogens. This approach is directly informing public health ...

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More accurate diagnostic test may reduce deaths

A more accurate, faster diagnostic test for Group B Streptococcal infection in babies has been reported in the Journal of Medical Microbiology. The new test could allow better treatment and management of the disease and reduce ...

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