Stowers Institute for Medical Research

The Stowers Institute for Medical Research is a biomedical research organization that conducts basic research on genes and proteins that control fundamental processes in living cells to analyze diseases and find keys to their causes, treatment, and prevention. The main facility is located in Kansas City, Missouri. The Institute was incorporated with an initial donation of $50 in 1894 by James E. Stowers and his wife Virginia Stowers, cancer survivors and founders of American Century Investments.

Website
http://www.stowers.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stowers_Institute_for_Medical_Research

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Medical research

How the historically misunderstood amyloid helps to store memories

For the first time, scientists from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research and collaborators have described the structure of an endogenously sourced, functioning neuronal amyloid at atomic resolution. The amyloid is composed ...

Oncology & Cancer

Zeroing in on how a tumor suppressor protein is cast away

Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have uncovered new details about several proteins implicated in tumor growth and metastasis, opening a potential avenue for the development of treatments for diseases ...

Medical research

Scientists have identified a bone marrow backup system

New research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research has identified the backup for an important biological system—the hematopoietic system, whose adult stem cells constantly replenish the body's blood supply.

Neuroscience

'Navigator' neurons play critical role in sense of smell

Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified "navigator" neurons that are key to setting up connections in the system responsible for the sense of smell. The new study builds on a breakthrough ...

Genetics

New finding reveals battle behind gene expression

The complex process regulating gene expression is often compared to following a recipe. Miss a genetic ingredient, or add it in the wrong order, and you could have a disaster on your hands.

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