The Translational Genomics Research Institute

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), is a non-profit genomics research institute established in 2002 by Jeffrey Trent, the founding Scientific Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), in Phoenix, Arizona, United States. TGen seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. TGen conducts research on a number of human disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Autism, Parkinson's, Diabetes and numerous forms of cancer and a variety of other complex human diseases. This internationally recognized institute has helped to generate a strong foundation for Arizona's growing role in scientific research and cutting edge biotechnology. The emerging field of translational genomics research harnesses the power of new discoveries resulting from the Human Genome Project and applying them to the development of improved diagnostics, prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological disorders, diabetes and other complex diseases.

Address
Phoenix, Arizona, United States of America
Website
http://www.tgen.org/

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Environment

Using floodwaters to weather droughts

Floodwaters are not what most people consider a blessing. But they could help remedy California's increasingly parched groundwater systems, according to a new Stanford-led study. The research, published in Science Advances, ...

Space Exploration

Scientists find carbon-rich liquid water in ancient meteorite

Water is abundant in the solar system. Even beyond Earth, scientists have detected ice on the moon, in Saturn's rings and in comets, liquid water on Mars and under the surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus, and traces of water ...

Archaeology

Cracking the code of the Dead Sea Scrolls

The Dead Sea Scrolls, discovered some 70 years ago, are famous for containing the oldest manuscripts of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and many hitherto unknown ancient Jewish texts. But the individual people behind the ...

Social Sciences

Swing vote 'trumped' turnout in 2016 election

Swing voters in battleground states delivered Donald Trump his unexpected victory in the 2016 presidential election, suggests a new study coauthored by Yale political scientist Gregory A. Huber.