The Translational Genomics Research Institute

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), is a non-profit genomics research institute established in 2002 by Jeffrey Trent, the founding Scientific Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), in Phoenix, Arizona, United States. TGen seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. TGen conducts research on a number of human disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Autism, Parkinson's, Diabetes and numerous forms of cancer and a variety of other complex human diseases. This internationally recognized institute has helped to generate a strong foundation for Arizona's growing role in scientific research and cutting edge biotechnology. The emerging field of translational genomics research harnesses the power of new discoveries resulting from the Human Genome Project and applying them to the development of improved diagnostics, prognostics and therapies for cancer, neurological disorders, diabetes and other complex diseases.

Address
Phoenix, Arizona, United States of America
Website
http://www.tgen.org/

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Materials Science

Plastics could see a second life as biodegradable surfactants

Scientists at the Institute for Cooperative Upcycling of Plastics (iCOUP), an Energy Frontier Research Center led by Ames Laboratory, have discovered a chemical process that provides biodegradable, valuable chemicals, which ...

General Physics

Investigating heavy quark physics with the LHCb experiment

A new review published in The European Physical Journal H by Clara Matteuzzi, Research Director at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) and former tenured professor at the University of Milan, and her colleagues, ...

Health

Epidemic of firearm injury spurs new wave of research

Fifty-five years ago, America's death toll from automobile crashes was sky-high. Nearly 50,000 people died every year from motor vehicle crashes, at a time when the nation's population was much smaller than today.

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