Tyndall National Institute

Tyndall National Institute in Cork, Ireland named for John Tyndall, scientist, is one of Europe's leading research centres, specialising in ICT hardware research, commercialisation of technology and the education of next generation researchers. Tyndall has a critical mass of over 420 researchers, engineers, students and support staff focused on quality research and the commercialisation of technology through industry collaboration. Tyndall's research expertise spans a range of technologies from atoms to systems in the areas of photonics, microsystems and micro-nanoelectronics and addresses key challenges in the areas of Communications, Energy, Health and the Environment. Queen Elizabeth II visited the research centre as part of her state visit to Ireland on 20 May 2011. Research is Tyndall's core activity and the many scientific and technological breakthroughs reported are testimony to the quality of research conducted at Tyndall. However, it is the application of that research and Tyndall's track record of industry engagement and licensing of technology to industry that sets it apart from other research providers. Tyndall has over 200 industry partnerships and customers worldwide.

Website
http://www.tyndall.ie/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyndall_National_Institute

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

General Physics

Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'

While the mesmerizing blobs in a classic lava lamp may appear magical, the colorful shapes move in response to temperature-induced changes in density and surface tension. This process, known as liquid-liquid phase separation, ...

Materials Science

Ultrathin spray-applied MXene antennas are ready for 5G

New antennas so thin that they can be sprayed into place are also robust enough to provide a strong signal at bandwidths that will be used by fifth-generation (5G) mobile devices. Performance results for the antennas, which ...

Neuroscience

How we learn words and sentences at the same time

How people work out the meanings of new words has been revealed by Lancaster University researchers, who say this is similar to the way in which young children learn language.