Universitaet Tübingen

Immunology

Immune response to bacteria—distinguishing helpers from harmers

Some staphylococcus bacteria live peacefully on human skin and membranes in a mutually beneficial relationship with their host, while others are able to exist far from a human host in soil or in water. When we come into contact ...

Neuroscience

Finding traces of memory processing during sleep

Sleep helps us to retain the information that we have learned during the day. We know from animal experiments that new memories are reactivated during sleep. The brain replays previous experience while we sleep – and this ...

Medical research

Scientists decipher a mechanism in serious skin infections

Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most feared, multi-resistant pathogens. The bacterium often causes life-threatening infections, particularly in people with a weakened immune system. During the last few years, especially ...

Neuroscience

Active and inactive cells in the brain's memory system

For the first time, Tübingen neuroscientists were able to differentiate between active and inactive cells in the brain morphologically, i.e. based on the cells' structure. Investigating granule cells in the rat's brain, ...

Neuroscience

The brain's multi-track road to long-term memory

Our brain has a tough task every time we experience something new – it must be flexible to take in new information instantly, but also stable enough to store it for a long time. And new memories may not be allowed to alter ...

Neuroscience

How the brain responds to choices

Choices, it is commonly understood, lead to action—but how does this happen in the brain? Intuitively, we first make a choice between the options. For example, when approaching a yellow traffic light, we need to decide ...

Neuroscience

How the brain builds place memories

Tübingen neuroscientists have succeeded in activating dormant memory cells in rats. Using weak electrical impulses targeted at previously inactive cells in the hippocampus, the researchers induced the cells to recognize ...

Neuroscience

What the mouse eye tells the mouse brain

Tübingen researchers have shown that image processing in the eye is more extensive than previously thought. They investigated the channels that transmit information from the eye to the brain. In the course of this investigation, ...

page 3 from 5