University of Bergen

The University of Bergen (Norwegian: Universitetet i Bergen) is located in Bergen, Norway. Although founded as late as 1946, academic activity had taken place at Bergen Museum as far back as 1825. The university today serves more than 14,500 students. It is one of eight universities in Norway, the other seven being the University of Oslo, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, the University of Tromsø, the University of Stavanger, the University of Agder, the Norwegian University of Life Sciences in Ås and the University of Nordland in Bodø. Home students (European citizens) do not pay fees to the university. Students are however required to be members of the student welfare organisation. As of Fall 2009, this fee (semesteravgift) is NOK 470 (approx. US$ 80) per semester, and provides access to several services, including cultural activities, childcare, refunds for many medical expenses and subsidized accommodation.

Address
Professor Keysers gt. 8, Bergen, Norway, Norway
Website
http://www.uib.no/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Bergen

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Oncology & Cancer

Overweight before age 40 increases cancer risk

In an international study, lead by the University of Bergen, the researchers wanted to find out how adult overweight (BMI over 25) and obesity (BMI over 30) increase the risk of different types of cancer.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Brush your teeth—postpone Alzheimer's

Researchers have determined that gum disease (gingivitis) plays a decisive role in whether a person develops Alzheimer´s or not.

Diabetes

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future

Diabetes is the inability to produce insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels, due to damaged or non-existing insulin cells. Many diabetes patients take insulin supplements to regulate these levels.

Diabetes

Researchers change clinical practice for infants with diabetes

It is not necessary to treat diabetic infants with insulin syringes. This will be new clinical practice after a recent study, now published in Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology in which researchers from Bergen and Exeter tested ...

Health

Vitamin D reduces mortality

A normal intake of vitamin D can reduce the risk of death substantially in people with cardiovascular disease, a Norwegian study shows.

Immunology

Intestinal worms may solve allergy puzzle

While young people with parasite worms currently have a four times higher risk for developing allergies and asthma than others. Their parents are generally unaffected.

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