University of Geneva

The University of Geneva (French: Université de Genève) is a public research university located in Geneva, Switzerland. It was founded in 1559 by John Calvin, as a theological seminary and law school. It remained focused on theology until the 17th century, when it became a center for Enlightenment scholarship. In 1873, it dropped its religious affiliations and became officially secular. Today, the university is the second-largest university in Switzerland. It has programs in various fields but is particularly acknowledged for its academic and research programs in international relations (with Geneva being hostess to a dense agglomeration of international organizations), law, astrophysics, astronomy, genetics (with a record of prominent contributions to the fields of planetary science, genetics, developmental psychology, neuroscience, and theology ). The university holds and actively pursues teaching, research, and community service as its primary objectives. In 2009, the University of Geneva celebrated the 450th anniversary of its founding. The university is a member of the League of European Research Universities.

Address
Bd du Pont-d'Arve 40, Geneva, Switzerland CH-1211
Website
http://www.unige.ch/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Geneva

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Neuroscience

A gentle method for unlocking the mysteries of the deep brain

The subcortical areas of the brain, situated in its deepest reaches, remain a mystery. Scientists are aware of the critical role they play in motor, emotional and associative activity but do not know precisely how they work. ...

Cancer

Neuroendocrine tumors: Choosing the best treatment

An increasing number of new anti-cancer drugs are approved each year. During the authorization process, such new drugs usually undergo comparisons to other single drugs, but only rarely to multiple established drugs. This ...

Medical research

Human cells can also change jobs

Biology textbooks teach us that adult cell types remain fixed in the identity they have acquired upon differentiation. By inducing non-insulin-producing human pancreatic cells to modify their function to produce insulin in ...

Neuroscience

How does the brain learn by talking to itself?

Humans, like other animals, possess an enormous learning capacity that allows for the apprehension of new sensory information to master new skills or to adapt to an ever-changing environment. However, many of the mechanisms ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Interpreting emotions: A matter of confidence

We are constantly exposed to the facial expressions of the people around us, expressions that reflect their emotions. But do we interpret them correctly? And do we trust our own judgment? This trust is essential for avoiding ...

Cancer

A new way to cut the power of tumors

Instead of tackling tumors head-on, an international team of researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Amsterdam UMC, location VUmc in Amsterdam has chosen to regulate their vascularization by intervening ...

Neuroscience

Drugs of abuse: Identifying the addiction circuit

What happens in the brain of a compulsive drug user? What is the difference in brain function between an addict and a person who takes a drug in a controlled manner? In an attempt solve this puzzle, neurobiologists at the ...

Health

Assessing India's health with a single question

A country can estimate its population's health status by using national survey questionnaires. A country like India, however, requires substantial, costly resources to monitor the health of its citizens, due to its size and ...

Medical research

A molecule for fighting muscular paralysis

Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis from birth and results in death before two years of age. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), ...

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