University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

The University of Strathclyde (Scottish Gaelic: Oilthigh Srath Chluaidh), Glasgow, Scotland, is Glasgow's second university by age, founded in 1796 by Professor John Anderson, and receiving its Royal Charter in 1964 as the UK's first technological university. It takes its name from the historic Kingdom of Strathclyde and is characterised today by leading research of international standing, with a reputation for excellence across research, education and knowledge exchange. The University of Strathclyde is Scotland's third largest university by number of students carrying an international reputation and outlook, with students and staff from over 100 countries. The university founded in 1796 through the will of Professor John Anderson, professor of Natural Philosophy at the University of Glasgow who left instructions and the majority of his estate to create a second university in Glasgow which would focus on "Useful Learning" – specialising in practical subjects – "for the good of mankind and the improvement of science, a place of useful learning". The University later named one of the two campuses after him.

Address
16 Richmond Street, Glasgow, Scotland, Scotland
Website
http://www.strath.ac.uk/

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Gerontology & Geriatrics

New assessment could identify risks of frailty

Signs of frailty, and the risks it brings, could be identified in young and old people alike through a new assessment developed in a study led by researchers at the University of Strathclyde.

Medical research

Measuring blood chemistry levels through the skin of newborns

Scientists at the University of Strathclyde are researching a system to measure and monitor blood chemistry levels in premature and sick babies through their skin, which if successful, could eventually replace the need for ...

Overweight & Obesity

Does fidgeting help to burn calories?

Children are often told off for fidgeting—but a study involving the University of Strathclyde has found that it could help them to use up energy amounting to nearly 3kg body weight a year.

Oncology & Cancer

Prostate cancer study shows promise for future treatment

A new 'seek-and-destroy' gene therapeutic system could have the potential to treat prostate cancer in the future, after it halted the majority of tumours in laboratory models at the University of Strathclyde and the Beatson ...

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