Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) traces its roots to 1874 in the Nashville, Tennessee region. Today, VUMC is an expansive network of clinics, physician and nurse training, research institutes, Level 1 Trauma Center. Level 4 Neonatal Intensive Care and Burn Center in the region which includes all of Tennessee and parts of Kentucky. VUMC has a history of medical discoveries and patient care breakthroughs, including but not limited to Earl Sutherland Jr and Stanley Cohen's Nobel Prize recipients. VUMC conducted the first cardiothoractic surgery for newborns with 'Blue Baby Syndrome'. And VUMC is a national cancer treatment center credited with numerous breakthroughs in treatment and organ transplants. Media inquiries are welcome.

Address
News & Public Affairs D-3237A Medical Center North Nashville, TN 37232
Website
http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ VUMC
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanderbilt_University_Medical_Center

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Medical research

A common insulin signaling pathway across cancer and diabetes

An oncology researcher has made an unexpected contribution to the understanding of type 2 diabetes. In results published in Science Advances, Patrick Hu, M.D., associate professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical ...

Oncology & Cancer

Breast cancer recurrence score has different implications for men

The TAILORx study published last year offered good news for women with early-stage ER-positive breast cancer who scored at intermediate risk for recurrence according to a genetic assay test. The study indicated that chemotherapy ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Consensus report shows burnout prevalent in health care community

Clinician burnout is affecting between one-third and one-half of all of U.S. nurses and physicians, and 45 to 60% of medical students and residents, according to a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) report released today.

Oncology & Cancer

Men with breast cancer face high mortality rates: Study

Men with breast cancer are more likely to die than their female counterparts, across all stages of disease, with the disparity persisting even when clinical characteristics, such as cancer types, treatment and access to care ...

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