Washington University School of Medicine

Neuroscience

Blood test detects Alzheimer's damage before symptoms

A simple blood test reliably detects signs of brain damage in people on the path to developing Alzheimer's disease—even before they show signs of confusion and memory loss, according to a new study from Washington University ...

Diabetes

New hope for stem cell approach to treating diabetes

Scientists working to develop more effective treatments for diabetes are turning to stem cells. Such cells can be transformed into cells that produce insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Decreased deep sleep linked to early signs of Alzheimer's disease

Poor sleep is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. People with the disease tend to wake up tired, and their nights become even less refreshing as memory loss and other symptoms worsen. But how and why restless nights are linked ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Racial differences in Alzheimer's disease unveiled

African-Americans may be twice as likely as Caucasian Americans to develop Alzheimer's disease, but nobody knows why because studies investigating the underlying causes of illness have historically drawn from a nearly all-white ...

Cancer

Sex differences identified in deadly brain tumors

For decades, scientists have recognized that more males get cancer and die of the disease than females. This is true for many types of cancer, including the deadly brain tumor glioblastoma. Now, a team of researchers led ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New genetic clues to early-onset form of dementia

Unlike the more common Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia tends to afflict young people. It accounts for an estimated 20 percent of all cases of early-onset dementia. Patients with the illness typically begin to ...

Neuroscience

Regrowing damaged nerves hinges on shutting down key genes

Neurons in the brain and spinal cord don't grow back after injury, unlike those in the rest of the body. Cut your finger, and you'll probably be back to using it in days or weeks; slice through your spinal cord, and you likely ...

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