Washington University School of Medicine

Psychology & Psychiatry

New genetic clues to early-onset form of dementia

Unlike the more common Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia tends to afflict young people. It accounts for an estimated 20 percent of all cases of early-onset dementia. Patients with the illness typically begin to ...

Neuroscience

Regrowing damaged nerves hinges on shutting down key genes

Neurons in the brain and spinal cord don't grow back after injury, unlike those in the rest of the body. Cut your finger, and you'll probably be back to using it in days or weeks; slice through your spinal cord, and you likely ...

Medical research

Scientists design way to track steps of cells' development

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new tool described as a "flight data recorder" for developing cells, illuminating the paths cells take as they progress from one type to ...

Neuroscience

Alcohol dependence, psychiatric disorders share genetic links

In the largest study of genetic factors linked to alcohol dependence, an international team of researchers identified a gene known to affect risk, and they determined that many other genes also contribute to risk for alcohol ...

Medical research

Brain, muscle cells found lurking in kidney organoids grown in lab

Scientists hoping to develop better treatments for kidney disease have turned their attention to growing clusters of kidney cells in the lab. One day, so-called organoids—grown from human stem cells—may help repair damaged ...

Cardiology

Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice

People with autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease, even though none of these conditions seem to target the cardiovascular system directly. ...

Cancer

Relapsed leukemia flies under immune system's radar

Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive cancer of the blood, often are treated with stem cell transplantation, in which a compatible donor's blood-forming cells are transplanted into a patient. The donor's ...

Neuroscience

Mind's quality control center found in long-ignored brain area

The cerebellum can't get no respect. Located inconveniently on the underside of the brain and initially thought to be limited to controlling movement, the cerebellum has long been treated like an afterthought by researchers ...

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