Studies uncover the hard-hitting consequences of sports-related head injuries

November 14, 2017 in Medicine & Health / Neuroscience

Playing contact sports can injure the brain even if head impacts don't result in concussions, according to new research presented today at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. The studies also suggest that relatively simple changes in equipment and athlete education could improve safety.

The risks of head injuries in sports have gained widespread attention in recent years, as studies of National Football League (NFL) players reveal the high prevalence of a neurodegenerative disease that impairs memory and changes personality. Although the focus has been on concussion, evidence indicates that less severe hits to the brain can also cause lasting damage.

Today's new findings show that:

"Today's findings continue to emphasize the dangers of in sports, as well as reveal specifics on the way particular brain regions are affected," said Linda Noble, PhD, of the University of Texas at Austin and an expert on injuries. "Understanding how athletes think about —when choosing their equipment or reporting injury—can help create better policies that will keep them safer."

Provided by Society for Neuroscience

"Studies uncover the hard-hitting consequences of sports-related head injuries" November 14, 2017 https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-11-uncover-hard-hitting-consequences-sports-related-injuries.html