Cardiology

A leap in understanding of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common of all genetic heart diseases and is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death. It is characterized by an abnormal thickening of the heart muscle, which over time can lead ...

Medical research

Shootin1a—the missing link underlying learning and memory

In neurons, changes in the size of dendritic spines—small cellular protrusions involved in synaptic transmission—are thought to be a key mechanism underlying learning and memory. However, the specific way in which these ...

Oncology & Cancer

Actinic keratosis diagnosis ups cumulative risk for skin cancer

(HealthDay)—The annual increase in risk for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is higher for patients who have received a diagnosis of one or more actinic keratoses (AKs), according to a study published online March ...

Oncology & Cancer

Tirbanibulin superior to placebo for actinic keratosis

(HealthDay)—Tirbanibulin is superior to vehicle at two months for the treatment of actinic keratosis, but almost half of patients who had a complete response experienced recurrence of lesions at one year, according to a ...

Medical research

Changing the perspective on the 'Cinderella of the cytoskeleton'

SETD2 is a protein well known as a chromatin remodeler, one that helps turn genes on or off by modifying histone proteins in the nucleus of the cell. When researchers discovered that SETD2 is mutated or lost in several cancer ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How plague pathogens trick the immune system

Yersinia have spread fear and terror, especially in the past, but today the plague pathogens have still not been completely eradicated. The bacteria inject various enzymes, including the enzyme YopO, into the macrophages ...

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Actinopterygii

The Actinopterygii /ˌæktɨnɒptəˈrɪdʒi.aɪ/ or ray-finned fishes constitute a class or sub-class of the bony fishes.

The ray-finned fishes are so called because they possess lepidotrichia or "fin rays", their fins being webs of skin supported by bony or horny spines ("rays"), as opposed to the fleshy, lobed fins that characterize the class Sarcopterygii which also, however, possess lepidotrichia. These actinopterygian fin rays attach directly to the proximal or basal skeletal elements, the radials, which represent the link or connection between these fins and the internal skeleton (e.g., pelvic and pectoral girdles).

In terms of numbers, actinopterygians are the dominant class of vertebrates, comprising nearly 96% of the 25,000 species of fish. They are ubiquitous throughout fresh water and marine environments from the deep sea to the highest mountain streams. Extant species can range in size from Paedocypris, at 8 millimetres (0.31 in), to the massive Ocean Sunfish, at 2,300 kilograms (5,100 lb), and the long-bodied Oarfish, to at least 11 metres (36 ft).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA