Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How plague pathogens trick the immune system

Yersinia have spread fear and terror, especially in the past, but today the plague pathogens have still not been completely eradicated. The bacteria inject various enzymes, including the enzyme YopO, into the macrophages ...

Oncology & Cancer

Form drives function in cancer proliferation

A new study finds that the protein responsible for the crawling movements of cells also drives the ability of cancer cells to grow when under stress.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Skin diseases are more common than we think

Skin diseases are ranked as the fourth most common cause of human illness, but many affected people do not consult a physician. A new Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology study estimates the prevalence ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Neuronal cytoskeletons involved in Alzheimer's disease

A researcher at the UPV/EHU participated in a study describing the loss of dynamics and subsequent impairment of the dendritic spines in Alzheimer's disease. Dendritic spines are the compartments of neurons responsible for ...

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Actinopterygii

The Actinopterygii /ˌæktɨnɒptəˈrɪdʒi.aɪ/ or ray-finned fishes constitute a class or sub-class of the bony fishes.

The ray-finned fishes are so called because they possess lepidotrichia or "fin rays", their fins being webs of skin supported by bony or horny spines ("rays"), as opposed to the fleshy, lobed fins that characterize the class Sarcopterygii which also, however, possess lepidotrichia. These actinopterygian fin rays attach directly to the proximal or basal skeletal elements, the radials, which represent the link or connection between these fins and the internal skeleton (e.g., pelvic and pectoral girdles).

In terms of numbers, actinopterygians are the dominant class of vertebrates, comprising nearly 96% of the 25,000 species of fish. They are ubiquitous throughout fresh water and marine environments from the deep sea to the highest mountain streams. Extant species can range in size from Paedocypris, at 8 millimetres (0.31 in), to the massive Ocean Sunfish, at 2,300 kilograms (5,100 lb), and the long-bodied Oarfish, to at least 11 metres (36 ft).

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