Medical research

Synthetic tissue model with blood vessels developed

Using lab-created tissue to heal or replace damaged organs is one of the great visions for the future of medicine. Synthetic materials could be suitable as scaffolding for tissue because, unlike natural tissues, they remain ...

Medical research

Shootin1a—the missing link underlying learning and memory

In neurons, changes in the size of dendritic spines—small cellular protrusions involved in synaptic transmission—are thought to be a key mechanism underlying learning and memory. However, the specific way in which these ...

Neuroscience

Astrocytes identified as master 'conductors' of the brain

In the orchestra of the brain, the firing of each neuron is controlled by two notes—excitatory and inhibitory—that come from two distinct forms of a cellular structure called synapses. Synapses are essentially the connections ...

Immunology

Fever alters immune cells so they can better reach infections

Fever is known to help power up our immune cells, and scientists in Shanghai have new evidence explaining how. They found in mice that fever alters surface proteins on immune cells like lymphocytes to make them better able ...

Neuroscience

The dynamics of directed axon migration in the brain

In a new study, NAIST scientists, in collaboration with researchers at the Osaka National Hospital and University of Tokyo, report that the L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule (L1-CAM) is crucial for directed axon migration. The study ...

Immunology

Watch immune cells 'glue' broken blood vessels back together

As we age, tiny blood vessels in the brain stiffen and sometimes rupture, causing "microbleeds." This damage has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline, but whether the brain can naturally repair ...

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