Parkinson's & Movement disorders

New research shows Parkinson's disease origins in the gut

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found additional evidence that Parkinson's disease originates among cells in the gut and travels up the body's neurons to the brain. The study, described ...

Medical research

Breaking down pathological protein aggregates

ETH researchers have discovered a new mechanism that brain cells use to protect themselves from protein aggregates. Such aggregates play a key role in Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. This new finding might ...

Parkinson's & Movement disorders

Inflamed monkey guts produce Parkinson's-related proteins

The intestinal linings of monkeys with inflamed bowels show chemical alterations similar to abnormal protein deposits in the brains of Parkinson's patients, lending support to the idea that inflammation may play a key role ...

Gerontology & Geriatrics

Breaking the vicious cycles of age-related diseases

Biologist Aleksey Belikov from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology has proposed that rapid progression of age-related diseases may result from the formation of so-called vicious cycles. An example of this is when ...

Parkinson's & Movement disorders

Defective glial cells can push neurons toward Parkinson's disease

Researchers from the University of Barcelona have shown that defective versions of human brain cells called astrocytes are linked to the buildup of a toxic protein that is the hallmark of Parkinson's disease. The studied ...

Parkinson's & Movement disorders

Parkinson's disease experts devise a roadmap

A recently discovered protein, alpha-synuclein, has become one of the most attractive targets for developing new drugs with the potential to slow down or arrest the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). Experts in the ...

Parkinson's & Movement disorders

A toxin that travels from stomach to brain may trigger Parkinsonism

Combining low doses of a toxic herbicide with sugar-binding proteins called lectins may trigger Parkinsonism—symptoms typical of Parkinson's disease like body tremors and slowing of body motions—after the toxin travels ...

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