Neuroscience

Decision-making process becomes visible in the brain

Without hardly noticing, we make countless decisions: to turn left or right on the bus? To wait or to accelerate? To look or to ignore? In the run-up to these decisions the brain evaluates sensory information and only then ...

Ophthalmology

Suitable marker for retina morphology across species

Outer retinal band (ORB) integrity and outer retinal thickness as they appear on OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) have been studied extensively due to their diagnostic value. They are predictive of visual outcome in many ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Rabies: How it spreads and how to protect yourself

A 21-year-old Canadian man recently died of rabies—a disease that kills an estimated 59,000 people a year internationally but hasn't infected a person in Canada since 2007.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Hunting Ebola's origins

The outbreak of Ebola that started in 2013 in West Africa, infecting nearly 30,000 people and killing 11,000 before it ended in 2016, has long left scientists puzzling over a key question: Where did the virus originate?

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Contact with monkeys and apes puts populations at risk

Animal diseases that infect humans are a major threat to human health, and diseases often spillover to humans from nonhuman primates. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have carried out an extensive ...

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Species

In biology, a species is:

There are many definitions of what kind of unit a species is (or should be). A common definition is that of a group of organisms capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring, and separated from other such groups with which interbreeding does not (normally) happen. Other definitions may focus on similarity of DNA or morphology. Some species are further subdivided into subspecies, and here also there is no close agreement on the criteria to be used.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA