Cardiology

Sugary stent eases suturing of blood vessels

Reconstructive procedures and organ transplants demand nimble fingers that can restore blood flow by stitching together millimeter-scale arteries. It's a tough ask and time-consuming task for even the most skilled surgeon.

Genetics

Genetic risk for atypical heart attack in women identified

New research published by teams from Leicester, UK and Paris, France in collaboration with international partners from the US and Australia, has found a common genetic factor that confers a significant risk of atypical heart ...

Cardiology

Brain health not affected by major heart surgery

Patients who undergo heart surgery do not experience major memory changes—either better or worse—when compared with those who have a much less invasive, catheter-based procedure, according to a study published online ...

Cardiology

Treatment for underdiagnosed cause of debilitating chest pain

Patients who arrive at the hospital with heart-attack-like symptoms have had little recourse for their chest pain if scans came back clear, with no signs of blocked coronary arteries. Some of these cases are caused by a little-known ...

Neuroscience

A new strategy for brain regeneration after stroke

Stroke is a leading cause of death and chronic disability in adults, causing a heavy social and economic burden worldwide. However, no treatments exist to restore neuronal circuitry after a stroke. While most neurons are ...

page 1 from 23

Artery

Arteries (from the Greek αρτηρία) are blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart. All arteries, with the exception of the pulmonary and umbilical arteries, carry oxygenated blood.

The circulatory system is extremely important for sustaining life. Its proper functioning is responsible for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to all cells, as well as the removal of carbon dioxide and waste products, maintenance of optimum pH, and the mobility of the elements, proteins and cells of the immune system. In developed countries, the two leading causes of death, myocardial infarction and stroke each may directly result from an arterial system that has been slowly and progressively compromised by years of deterioration. (See atherosclerosis).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA