Neuroscience

Researchers discover how the brain 're-wires' after disease

Trinity researchers are studying how the brain re-wires itself in neurological disease. The team is building treatments for today's more common global conditions like motor neurone disease (MND/ALS) and spinal muscular ...

Genetics

Concern following gene therapy adverse events

The Editor-in-Chief of Human Gene Therapy, the first journal devoted to the field of gene therapy, and one of the world's leading experts on gene therapy have co-authored a new editorial, Moving Forward After Two Deaths in ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Progressive MS linked to faster retinal atrophy than RRMS

(HealthDay)—Progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS) is associated with faster retinal atrophy than relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), independent of age, according to a study published in the June issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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Atrophy

Atrophy is the partial or complete wasting away of a part of the body. Causes of atrophy include poor nourishment, poor circulation, loss of hormonal support, loss of nerve supply to the target organ, disuse or lack of exercise or disease intrinsic to the tissue itself. Hormonal and nerve inputs that maintain an organ or body part are referred to as trophic.

Atrophy is a general physiological process of reabsorption and breakdown of tissues, involving apoptosis on a cellular level. When it occurs as a result of disease or loss of trophic support due to other disease, it is termed pathological atrophy, although it can be a part of normal body development and homeostasis as well.

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