Neuroscience

What you hear could depend on what your hands are doing

New research links motor skills and perception, specifically as it relates to a second finding—a new understanding of what the left and right brain hemispheres "hear." Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say ...

Other

Study shows background noise affects test scores

(Medical Xpress) -- A new study presented at the 162nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America shows that students testing scores are negatively affected by background noise, but not the noise you would expect. The background ...

Medical research

Tuning in to a new hearing mechanism

More than 30 million Americans suffer from hearing loss, and about 6 million wear hearing aids. While those devices can boost the intensity of sounds coming into the ear, they are often ineffective in loud environments such ...

Neuroscience

Report Says Musicians Hear Better Than Non-Musicians

(PhysOrg.com) -- The Journal of Neuroscience reports this week that musicians are better than non-musicians at recognizing speech in noisy environments.  The finding from a study conducted by neurobiologists at Northwestern ...

Neuroscience

New brain findings on dyslexic children

The vast majority of school-aged children can focus on the voice of a teacher amid the cacophony of the typical classroom thanks to a brain that automatically focuses on relevant, predictable and repeating auditory information, ...

Neuroscience

Playing sports might sharpen your hearing

(HealthDay)—Playing sports may improve the brain's ability to process sounds, a finding that could lead to new therapies for people who struggle with hearing, researchers report.

Neuroscience

Good noise, bad noise: White noise improves hearing

Noise is not the same as noise—and even a quiet environment does not have the same effect as white noise. With a background of continuous white noise, hearing pure sounds becomes even more precise, as researchers from the ...

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