Obstetrics & gynaecology

Nine women share what it's like to have a miscarriage

Miscarriage is a common woman's health experience, but one that affects people differently. Ten years of studying miscarriage has taught me that no two women will have the same experience, and that the same woman is likely ...

Oncology & Cancer

How to reduce your risk of gynecological cancer

The American Cancer Society estimates about 115,000 women will be diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer this year. That's one case about every five minutes. These types of malignancies originate in the female reproductive organs, ...

page 1 from 39

Bleeding

Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences) is the loss of blood from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, or anus, or through a break in the skin. The complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination, and desanguination is a massive blood loss. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10-15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8-10% of the donor's blood volume.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA