Oncology & Cancer

Incidence of VTE, major bleeding high in primary CNS lymphoma

(HealthDay)—The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and major bleeding is high among patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), according to a study published online June 23 in Leukemia & Lymphoma.

Medications

Safety, effectiveness of VKAs, DOACs similar in general practice

(HealthDay)—For patients receiving anticoagulants, arteriovenous events and major bleeding events do not differ for those receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), according to a study ...

Cardiology

What's the best blood thinner if you have a-fib?

(HealthDay)—People with the heart condition atrial fibrillation often use blood thinners to help prevent a stroke. Now a new study suggests one of those medications might stand out as safer and more effective.

Cardiology

Study compares anticoagulants for antiphospholipid syndrome

(HealthDay)—In thrombotic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), rivaroxaban is not noninferior to dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Bleeding

Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences) is the loss of blood from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, or anus, or through a break in the skin. The complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination, and desanguination is a massive blood loss. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10-15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8-10% of the donor's blood volume.

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