Cardiology

Combo antithrombotic therapy increases bleeding risk

(HealthDay)—Patients with chronic coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease treated with the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin face a greater risk for bleeding versus patients treated with aspirin alone, ...

Medications

History of liver disease does not impact efficacy of edoxaban

(HealthDay)—For patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), the efficacy and safety of edoxaban versus warfarin is not altered with a history of liver disease, according to a study published in the July 16 issue of the Journal ...

Medications

Dabigatran doesn't beat aspirin for preventing recurrent stroke

(HealthDay)—Dabigatran is not superior to aspirin for preventing recurrent stroke in patients with recent history of embolic stroke of undetermined source, according to a study published in the May 16 issue of the New England ...

Neuroscience

Lowering blood pressure reduces brain bleeding in strokes

The search for treatments for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, the most devastating type of stroke, which carries a 40% mortality rate, has been rife with disappointments. But a new study suggests that intensive blood ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Heavy periods? You might have an undiagnosed bleeding disorder

About 30 per cent of all women report heavy menstrual periods at some point during their reproductive years. Up to 15 per cent of these have an underlying bleeding disorder and yet most have never been diagnosed, leaving ...

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Bleeding

Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences) is the loss of blood from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, or anus, or through a break in the skin. The complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination, and desanguination is a massive blood loss. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10-15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8-10% of the donor's blood volume.

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