Medical research

Platelet 'decoys' outsmart both clots and cancer

Heart disease, stroke, sepsis, and cancer collectively cause the greatest number of deaths worldwide. They also have something else in common: all of them are associated with activated platelets, the cells that circulate ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

A new culprit for multiple sclerosis relapses

A molecule that helps blood clot may also play a role in multiple sclerosis relapses, researchers report in the May 6 issue of PNAS. The new research may help answer the mystery of why remissions happen, as well as find early ...

Inflammatory disorders

Potential new therapy for Crohn's, colitis identified

People with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) live with frequent, miserable episodes of abdominal pain, diarrhea and in severe cases, rectal bleeding. Standard treatments are aimed at directly suppressing inflammation, but ...

Immunology

New immunotherapy targeting blood-clotting protein

Normally, the blood protein fibrin does not enter the brain. But in several neurological disorders, the blood-brain barrier—which keeps large molecules in the blood from entering the brain—becomes abnormally permeable, ...

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Thrombus

A thrombus (Greek θρόμβος), or blood clot, is the final product of the blood coagulation step in hemostasis. It is achieved via the aggregation of platelets that form a platelet plug, and the activation of the humoral coagulation system (i.e. clotting factors). A thrombus is normal in cases of injury, but pathologic in instances of thrombosis.

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