Gerontology & Geriatrics

How interval training affects 'belly fat' in obese 70-year-olds

By today's estimates, one-third of adults aged 65 or older are obese. This growing obesity trend, along with the decrease in our level of physical activity as we age, seriously raises our risk of diseases and death.

Neuroscience

Frequent sauna bathing reduces risk of stroke

Frequent sauna bathing is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, according to a new international study. In a 15-year follow-up study, people taking a sauna four to seven times a week were 61 per cent less likely to suffer ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

'Skinny fat' in older adults may predict dementia, Alzheimer's risk

A new study has found that "skinny fat—the combination of low muscle mass and strength in the context of high fat mass—may be an important predictor of cognitive performance in older adults. While sarcopenia, the loss ...

Overweight & Obesity

I go to the gym every day. Why can't I lose weight?

Liz is a typical 50-something woman, fit, 70 kg, 30% body fat. She goes to the gym every day, and runs for 35 minutes on the treadmill at 10km/h. But, as she tells me rather often, she can't lose weight. So what's going on ...

Cardiology

Researchers develop more accurate measure of body fat

Cedars-Sinai investigators have developed a simpler and more accurate method of estimating body fat than the widely used body mass index, or BMI, with the goal of better understanding obesity.

Overweight & Obesity

Obesity rates keep rising for U.S. adults

Obesity rates have continued to climb significantly among American adults, but the same hasn't held true for children, a new government report finds.

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Body weight

Although many people prefer the less-ambiguous term body mass, the term body weight is overwhelmingly used in daily English speech and in biological and medical science contexts to describe the mass of an organism's body. Body weight is measured in kilograms throughout the world, although in some countries people more often measure and describe body weight in pounds (e.g. United States and sometimes Canada) or stones and pounds (e.g. United Kingdom) and thus may not be well acquainted with measurement in kilograms. Most hospitals in the United States now use kilograms for calculations, but use kilograms and pounds together for other purposes. (1 kg is approximately 2.2 lb; 1 stone (14 lb) is approximately 6.4 kg.)

The term is usually encountered in connection with:

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