Neuroscience

Waves move across the human brain to support memory

The coordination of neural activity across widespread brain networks is essential for human cognition. Researchers have long assumed that oscillations in the brain, commonly measured for research purposes, brain-computer ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Unique visual stimulation may be new treatment for Alzheimer's

Using LED lights flickering at a specific frequency, MIT researchers have shown that they can substantially reduce the beta amyloid plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease, in the visual cortex of mice.

Neuroscience

Rhythmic control of 'brain waves' can boost memory: study

Controlling the frequency of 'brain waves' could help to improve people's recall of memories and potentially provide a key to unlock conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, according to a new article.

Neuroscience

Why visual stimulation may work against Alzheimer's

Several years ago, MIT neuroscientists showed that they could dramatically reduce the amyloid plaques seen Alzheimer's disease in mice simply by exposing the animals to light flickering at a specific frequency.

Neuroscience

Overactive brain waves trigger essential tremor

The source of essential tremor—a movement disorder that causes involuntary trembling of the hands, arms, and head—has been enigmatic, impeding the development of effective treatments for a condition that affects 4% of ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer's symptoms

By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients.

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