Psychology & Psychiatry

Phantom-limb pain reduced through brain power

Phantom-limb pain is as mysterious as the name implies. The vast majority of amputees experience "phantom-limb" sensations that make them feel their missing limb is still part of their body. The cause is still unknown, and ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Virtual reality makes empathy easier

Virtual reality activates brain networks that increase your ability to identify with other people, according to new research published in eNeuro. The technology could become a tool in the treatment of violent offenders to ...

Neuroscience

Musical perception: nature or nurture?

From a general perspective, harmony in music is the balance of the proportions between the different parts of a whole, which causes a feeling of pleasure. "When we listen to music, each sound we hear helps us to imagine what ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Two studies reveal benefits of mindfulness for middle school students

Two new studies from MIT suggest that mindfulness—the practice of focusing one's awareness on the present moment—can enhance academic performance and mental health in middle schoolers. The researchers found that more ...

Neuroscience

Training can reverse nicotine-induced brain damage

Motor-skill training has proved capable of reversing brain impairments in rats treated with nicotine. This effect has been demonstrated in a recent study and, in the long term, the method may also come to be tested as an ...

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Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day!

Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day!, also known as Dr. Kawashima's Brain Training: How Old Is Your Brain? in PAL regions, is an entertainment video game that employs puzzles. It was developed and published by the video gaming company Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld video game console. Nintendo has been careful not to claim the game has been scientifically validated, however stating that it is an 'entertainment product "inspired" by Dr. Kawashima's work' in the neurosciences.

It was first released in Japan, and was later released in North America, Europe, Australia, and South Korea. It was followed by a sequel titled Brain Age 2: More Training in Minutes a Day!, and was later followed by two redesigns and Brain Age 2 for the Nintendo DSi's DSiWare service which uses popular puzzles from these titles as well as several new puzzles.

Brain Age features a variety of puzzles, including stroop tests, mathematical questions, and Sudoku puzzles, all designed to help keep certain parts of the brain active. It was included in the Touch! Generations series of video games, a series which features games for a more casual gaming audience. Brain Age uses the touch screen and microphone for many puzzles. There has been controversy over the game's scientific effectiveness.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA