Cancer

Should you get tested for the 'Breast cancer genes'?

(HealthDay)—Women who have specific mutations in genes known as BRCA are at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers. Now, an influential expert panel reaffirms that certain women should be screened for the genes.

Medical research

Genetically sequencing DNA could yield patient care insights

Increasingly, the words "genetics" and "genome" are making their way into news stories about health and medicine. Doctors talk about scientific research—how there may be links between gene mutations in your DNA and an increased ...

Cancer

New drug targets for BRCA-driven cancer uncovered

BRCA1 and BRCA2 ("BReast CAncer genes") are critical tumor suppressor genes—women carrying a mutation in one of these genes have up to an 80 percent risk of developing breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of developing ovarian ...

Cancer

New insight into aggressive breast cancers

Scientists from Cardiff University have uncovered a protein which drives aggressive breast cancer and could be targeted for developing new and improved therapies.

Cancer

The long and short of CDK12

Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes pose a serious risk for breast and ovarian cancer because they endanger the genomic stability of a cell by interfering with homologous recombination repair (HR), a key mechanism for ...

Cancer

Researcher uses smartphone to detect breast cancer gene

With increasing demand and pressure on healthcare budgets, progressive initiatives are being taken to make healthcare more patient-centered, reliable, accessible and affordable. Point-of-care devices have become a cost-efficient ...

Genetics

Guardians of the Genome

For many, breast cancer is more than just a disease – it's personal. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives. But through new discoveries at the genetic level, the personal nature ...

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BRCA1

BRCA1 ( /ˈbrækə/; breast cancer 1, early onset) is a human caretaker gene that produces a protein called breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein, responsible for repairing DNA. The first evidence for the existence of the gene was provided by the King laboratory at UC Berkeley in 1990. The gene was later cloned in 1994 by scientists at Myriad Genetics.

BRCA1 is expressed in the cells of breast and other tissue, where it helps repair damaged DNA, or destroy cells if DNA cannot be repaired. If BRCA1 itself is damaged, damaged DNA is not repaired properly and this increases risks for cancers.

The protein encoded by the BRCA1 gene combines with other tumor suppressors, DNA damage sensors, and signal transducers to form a large multi-subunit protein complex known as the BRCA1-associated genome surveillance complex (BASC). The BRCA1 protein associates with RNA polymerase II, and through the C-terminal domain, also interacts with histone deacetylase complexes. Thus, this protein plays a role in transcription, DNA repair of double-stranded breaks ubiquitination, transcriptional regulation as well as other functions.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA