Psychology & Psychiatry

Study analyzes personality traits of bullies, victims

(PhysOrg.com) -- Individuals with a high level of self-compassion were less likely to have been a bully or a victim, finds new research by University of Arizona undergraduate Michelle Harris.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Researchers advocate kindness to combat bullying

(PhysOrg.com) -- The stereotypical school bully of past generations was easy to identify -- the playground brute victimizing those weaker and vulnerable.

Health

Nurses often cyberbullied by patients and families

Research by a Massey University PhD candidate into workplace cyberbullying has found that nurses not only experience bullying by other staff, but also by patients and their families.

Psychology & Psychiatry

The empathy gap in bullying

Taunted, harassed and pushed to a deadly breaking point. Last year, stories of teen bullying brought to life the heartbreaking consequences of young lives cut short by ruthless and unchecked behavior. Recent media coverage ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Speech-language pathologists positioned to help victims of bullying

(PhysOrg.com) -- Bullying has gained national attention recently after the suicides of Phoebe Prince, a high school student from Massachusetts, and Tyler Clementi, a college student from Rutgers University. The problem may ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Easy to bully digitally

Two out of three children have experienced bullying via the Internet or mobile phones according to a survey made by Telenor in 2008. The survey also shows that parents are uncertain about what to do about this kind of bullying.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Being bullied can cause PTSD in children, study finds

(Medical Xpress)—Problems caused by bullying do not necessarily cease when the abuse stops. Recent research at the Universitiy of Stavanger (UiS) and Bergen's Center for Crisis Psychology in Norway shows that victims may ...

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Bullying

Bullying is a form of aggressive behavior manifested by the use of force or coercion to affect others, particularly when the behavior is habitual and involves an imbalance of power. It can include verbal harassment, physical assault or coercion and may be directed persistently towards particular victims, perhaps on grounds of race, religion, gender, sexuality, or ability. The "imbalance of power" may be social power and/or physical power. The victim of bullying is sometimes referred to as a "target."

Bullying consists of three basic types of abuse – emotional, verbal, and physical. It typically involves subtle methods of coercion such as intimidation. Bullying can be defined in many different ways. The UK currently has no legal definition of bullying, while some U.S. states have laws against it.

Bullying ranges from simple one-on-one bullying to more complex bullying in which the bully may have one or more 'lieutenants' who may seem to be willing to assist the primary bully in his bullying activities. Bullying in school and the workplace is also referred to as peer abuse. Robert W. Fuller has analyzed bullying in the context of rankism.

Bullying can occur in any context in which human beings interact with each other. This includes school, church, family, the workplace, home, and neighborhoods. It is even a common push factor in migration. Bullying can exist between social groups, social classes, and even between countries (see jingoism). In fact, on an international scale, perceived or real imbalances of power between nations, in both economic systems and in treaty systems, are often cited as some of the primary causes of both World War I and World War II.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA