Oncology & Cancer

New cancer immunotherapy shows promise in early tests

Much cancer immunotherapy research has focused on harnessing the immune system's T cells to fight tumors, "but we knew that other types of immune cells could be important in fighting cancer too," says Ashish Kulkarni at the ...

Oncology & Cancer

Gene-targeted cancer drugs, slow release overcome resistance

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method to address failures in a promising anti-cancer drug, bringing together tools from genome engineering, protein engineering and biomaterials science to improve ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer drugs don't always work as intended, researchers warn

Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have identified 10 cancer drugs currently in clinical trials that do not work how clinicians thought they would. In identifying what went wrong, experts can now work to improve ...

Oncology & Cancer

Scientists develop possible strategy for cancer drug resistance

Scientists from the National Institutes of Health and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have devised a potential treatment against a common type of leukemia that could have implications for many other types of ...

Oncology & Cancer

Genome screen uncovers new targets for cancer immunotherapy

Immunotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of cancer in the last decade, yet many tumors do not respond to these new therapies. A new genome-wide screen of 20,000 human genes in T cells have turned up several new candidates ...

Oncology & Cancer

Two therapeutic targets identified for deadly lung cancer

The vast majority of deadly lung cancer cases (85 percent) are termed non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), which often contain a mutated gene called LKB1. Salk Institute researchers have now discovered precisely why inactive ...

Oncology & Cancer

Unlocking therapies for hard-to-treat lung cancers

Now, a new Salk Institute study, published on July 24, 2019, in the journal Science Advances, shows that researchers could target these hard-to-treat cancers by pursuing drugs that keep a cellular "switch," called CREB, from ...

Oncology & Cancer

A new way to stop cancer cells from killing their healthy neighbors

One of the reasons cancer cells are so robust against the body's natural defenses is that they are in fact human cells, and as such they have the innate machinery not only to trick the body's defense and maintenance systems, ...

page 1 from 23