Immunology

How to keep kids with food allergies safe during Halloween

Halloween can be a particularly difficult time for kids with food allergies since many common candies contain one or more common allergens. The consequences can be dangerous and traumatic for kids who accidentally consume ...

Neuroscience

How preschoolers' brains develop self-control

As their brain regions linked to self-control mature, preschoolers improve in their ability to stop themselves from doing something, according to new research published in JNeurosci.

Biomedical technology

Candy-coated pills could prevent pharmaceutical fraud

While most of us were baking sourdough bread and watching "Tiger King" to stay sane during the pandemic shutdown, UC Riverside bioengineering professor William Grover kept busy counting the colorful candy sprinkles perched ...

Pediatrics

Should I send my kids trick-or-treating this year?

The kids are begging to partake in one of their favorite holiday traditions of the year—trick-or-treating. But we are still deep in the global pandemic. So do we skip the door-to-door candy festivities this year or is there ...

page 1 from 7

Candy

Candy, specifically sugar candy, is a confection made from a concentrated solution of sugar in water, to which flavorings and colorants are added. Candies come in numerous colors and varieties and have a long history in popular culture.

The Middle English word "candy" began to be used in the late 13th century, coming into English from the Old French çucre candi, derived in turn from Persian Qand (=قند) and Qandi (=قندی), "cane sugar". In North America, candy is a broad category that includes candy bars, chocolates, licorice, sour candies, salty candies, tart candies, hard candies, taffies, gumdrops, marshmallows, and more.[citation needed] Vegetables, fruit, or nuts which have been glazed and coated with sugar are said to be candied.

Outside North America, the generic English-language name for candy is sweets or confectionery (United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa and other commonwealth countries). In Australia, small pieces of sweet substance are known as "lollies".

In North America, Australia, NZ and the UK, the word "lollipop" refers specifically to sugar candy with flavoring on a stick. While not used in the generic sense of North America, the term candy is used in the UK for specific types of foods such as candy floss (cotton candy in North America and fairy floss in Australia), and certain other sugar based products such as candied fruit.

A popular candy in Latin America is the so-called pirulín (also known as pirulí), which is a multicolor, conic-shaped hard candy of about 10 to 15 cm long, with a sharp conical or pyramidal point, with a stick in the base, and wrapped in cellophane.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA