Cancer

Semaphorin linked to lung cancer treatment resistance

Lung cancer remains a major cause of mortality across the globe, although we are gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic background behind this disease, including the mutations that promote it. Mutation in the gene ...

Cancer

Researchers ID new biomarker for colorectal cancers

Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a protein involved in cell proliferation and the development of new blood vessels that could serve as a marker for the early detection of colorectal cancers.

Cancer

Research reveals machinery of a deadly childhood brain cancer

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have mapped the effects of aberrant biological machinery that drives a deadly brain cancer called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). The research included development ...

Cancer

Pushing closer to a new cancer-fighting strategy

A molecular pathway that's frequently mutated in many different forms of cancer becomes active when cells push parts of their membranes outward into bulging protrusions, Johns Hopkins researchers report in a new study. The ...

Cancer

Checkmating tumors

Chess and cancer research have one thing in common: It takes strategy to defeat the opponent. And that's exactly what scientists at the MDC are doing. They are seeking to selectively make only those cancer cells aggressive ...

Genetics

Researchers find multisystem disorder caused by CCDC47 variants

Researchers and clinicians through a multicenter collaboration have identified a novel multisystem disorder caused by bi-allelic variants in the CCDC47 gene. Their findings are reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

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Cell growth

The term cell growth is used in the contexts of cell development and cell division (reproduction). When used in the context of cell division, it refers to growth of cell populations, where one cell (the "mother cell") grows and divides to produce two "daughter cells".

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